Cannabis Is In Your DNA

Cannabis Is In Your DNA
http://youtu.be/aWXuaMXfbJABy minivanjackOriginally Published on Apr 22, 2016

The nutritional and healing powers of fresh raw Cannabis is one of of the best kept secrets of the last century. Because Cannabis is, essentially, a wonder plant, it was only a matter of time before the anti-cannabis propaganda machine would fall apart. That is what is happening today. This video calls out the “authorities” who do nothing but harm the public for enrichment and corruption of the state.

http://youtu.be/qgEP9FdIzT8

(Dr. William Courtney, Cannabis Therapies)http://youtu.be/VsDic2na8co
(How Cannabis Cures Cancer)

https://www.leafly.com/news/health/a-dietitians-perspective-on-cannabis
Medical Cannabis and Its Impact on Human Health a Cannabis Documentary (Cancer,Aids,Crohn’s & more)
SETH Research Laboratories finds the Cure for Cancer

https://www.naturalnews.com/035759_cannabis_juicing_health.htmlhttps://montanabiotech.com/2011/03/26/scientists-find-new-sources-of-plant-cannabinoids-other-than-medical-marijuana/

Canadian Marijuana Documentary: The Health, The Benefits, The Truth!
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61 Health Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

61 Health Benefits of Omega-3 Fatty Acids

By: Pat Robinson

There is strong evidence that omega-3 fatty acids have a beneficial effect in bipolar disorder.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation is associated with reduced mania and depression in juvenile bipolar disorder.

Clinical studies have reported that oral fish oil supplementation has beneficial effects in rheumatoid arthritis and among some asthmatics.

Fish oil improves tubular dysfunction, lipid profiles and oxidative stress in patients with IgA nephropathy.

Dietary supplementation with flaxseed oil lowers blood pressure in dyslipidaemic patients.

Omega 3 fatty acids improve the cardiovascular risk profile of subjects with metabolic syndrome, including markers of inflammation and auto-immunity.

Omega-3 in modest doses reduces cardiac deaths, and in high doses reduces nonfatal cardiovascular events.

Dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids reduces the incidence of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction.

Omega-3 fatty acid reduce the total mortality and sudden death in patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction.

Raising blood levels of omega-3 fatty acid levels may be 8 times effective than distributing automated external defibrillators (AEDs), and 2 times more effective than implanting implanting cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) in preventing sudden death.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduces total mortality and sudden death in patients who have already had a heart attack.

Consuming small quantities of fish is associated with a reduction in coronary heart disease.

Omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D supplementation results in a substantial reduction in coronary calcium scores and slowed plaque growth.

Omega-3 fatty acids prevent atrial fibrillation after coronary artery bypass surgery.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has a therapeutic effect in children with ADHD.

A combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids as well as magnesium and zinc consumption provide a beneficial effect on attentional, behavioural, and emotional problems of children and adolescents.

Fish oil supplementation has a significant therapeutic effect on children with autism.

Omega-3 fatty acids appear to be an effective treatment for children with autism.

The consumption of omega-3 fatty acid supplements decreases homocysteine levels in diabetic patients.

Omega-3 fatty acids improve macro- and microvascular function in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

In patients with stable coronary artery disease, an independent and inverse association exists between n-3 fatty acid levels and inflammatory biomarkers.

Omega-3 fatty acids improve endothelial function in peripheral arterial disease.

Fish oil has a beneficial effect on blood viscosity in peripheral vascular disease.

Fish oil supplementation improves walking distance in peripheral arterial disease.

The omega-3 fatty acid docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) reduces the risk of peripheral arterial diseaseassociated with smoking.

An 8-month treatment with omega-3 fatty acids (EPA and DHA) has a positive effects, such as decreasing inflammation, in patients with cystic fibrosis.

Omega-3 fatty acids may have a protective effect against mucus over-production caused by pulmonary bacterial colonization in cystic fibrosis.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation reduces inflammatory biomarkers, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and interleukin-8 concentrations in cystic fibrosis patients.

DHA increases resistance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.

EPA supplementation has therapeutic value in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients.

EPA and DHA have therapeutic value in the treatment of systemic lupus erythmeatosus.

Omega-3 fish oil reduces the severity of symptoms in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

Fish and long-chain omega-3 fatty acid intake reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and total mortalityin diabetic women.

Higher plasma concentrations of EPA and DPA are associated with a lower risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction among women.

Omega-3 fatty acid consumption is inversely associated with incidence of hypertension.

Fish oil, but not flaxseed oil, decreases inflammation and prevents pressure overload-induced cardiac dysfunction.

The consumption of fish reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in elderly individuals.

A moderate intake of EPA and DHA may postpone cognitive decline in elderly men.

Omega-3 fatty acids may have a therapeutic effect on postpartum depression.

Omega-3 fatty acids may have therapeutic value in the treatment of dry eye syndrome.

Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation exhibits therapeutic value in the treatment of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptomatology.

Fish consumption reduces the risk of ischemic stroke in men.

Omega-3 Fatty acids supplementation prevents and reverses insulin resistance.

Omega-3 fatty acids prevent the formation of urinary calcium oxalate stone formation.

Omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for children with bronchial asthma.

Omega 3 fatty acid supplementation may contribute to the prevention of early preterm birth in both low-risk and high-risk pregnancies.

Fish consumption is associated with a 63% reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality.

Omega 3 fatty acids decrease the severity of autoimmune disorders.
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) may have a therapeutic role in attenuating pulmonary hypertension.

Omega-3 fatty acids resulted in an improvement in weight bearing in dogs with osteoarthritis.

Primary open-angle glaucoma patients have reduced blood levels of DHA and EPA.

Omega-3 fatty acids alleviate insulin resistance and fatty liver in obese mice.

Intake of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids from fish may be associated with a reduced prevalence of allergic rhinitis.

Cod liver oil (omega-3 Fatty Acids) reduces the need for NSAIDs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids has significant therapeutic benefits and drug sparing activity in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

Diets containing EPA and DHA have an inhibitory effect on breast cancer growth and metastasis.

Dietary Omega-3 fatty acids may protect smokers against chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Omega-3 fatty acids were shown to be more effective than placebo for depression in both adults and children in small controlled studies and in an open study of bipolar depression.

The omega-3 fatty acid EPA is as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating major depressive disorder.

A diet low in trans-unsaturated fat and rich in omega-3 fatty acids and olive oil may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration.

Higher intake of omega 3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of pneumonia.

Source GreenMedInfo

About to the Author:

Pat Robinson

Pat Robinson was in the medical industry for decades. She has invested
over 10,000 hours learning about natural alternatives, reading hundreds and hundreds of medical research studies, and assisting thousands of people about holistic health issues.

Pat is passionate about sharing the amazing power of the body to heal itself.

Healer or Hoax? | Charlie Goldsmith put to the test

Healer or Hoax? | Charlie Goldsmith put to the test

By Sunday Night

To his believers, he’s known simply as ‘The Healer’. Charlie Goldsmith claims he possesses a mysterious energy that can cure the sick using just his mind. The self-proclaimed energy healer from Melbourne says he can end chronic pain, cure crippling arthritis, even save lives. And he has plenty of patients who will attest to his inexplicable powers. But is he truly a healer or is it all a hoax? Sunday Night’s Angela Cox has put Goldsmith’s claims to the test in this three-month-long investigation.

Discover more Sunday Night stories –

http://www.sundaynight.com.au

Note from Angel4light:

It is obvious that Charlie is very gifted.

Unfortunately most Allopathic doctors are quick to poo poo this sort of healing that Charlie does, because there is no money to be made. But thank goodness there are good doctors out there who are very concerned about their patients more than the money.

I don’t have TV so I am not sure if the Show is still available, but if you have Cable, check with your provider to see if “The Healer” is available.

I believe that we each have the gift of healing, we just need to go within and remember who we are.

Namaste

31 Powerful Native American Medicinal Cures

31 Powerful Native American Medicinal Cures

by EraOfLight

It was the belief of the Native American population that the Creator provided them with the medicinal herbs required for natural healing. Utilizing trees, flowers, fruit and plants that each carried their own health benefits, signs of their holistic approach is still clearly seen in today’s modern medicine.

One example of the impact of Native American medicine is Aspirin, which comes from salicin, a chemical that is found within the bark of the willow tree. Other commonly used natural alternatives include chamomile tea, bee pollen/beeswax and licorice tea.

It is unclear how they came to discover which plants carried medicinal benefits. While some believe they relied heavily on trial and error, other researchers point to oral accounts of watching sick animals, determining which plants were able to provide these animals with relief.

The medicines were created in pastes or teas, that had to be consumed or applied to the skin. In cases of open wounds, salves or poultice were used. It is not commended that you consume plants in the event they are infected in any way.

If you are pregnant, please consult a medical professional prior to using any of these herbs.

Here are 31 herbs that were commonly used by Native American Medicine Men to treat everything from insect bites to the common cold:

Alfalfa

Alfalfa

Used to treat bladder, arthritis, kidney conditions and bone strength. Alfalfa has been found to improve digestion, strengthen the immune system and aid in blood clotting.

Aloe

Aloe

The thick sap found within the leaves of the aloe plant can be used to treat burns, wounds and insect bites. It assists in relieving itching.

Aspen

Aspen

Aspen contains salicin, the main ingredient in Aspirin which is found in the bark of the willow tree. It can be used in tea to find relief of coughs, fever and pain.

Bee Pollen

Bee Pollen

When mixed with food, bee pollen has been found to increase energy levels boost the immune system and aid in digestion.

Caution: If you are allergic you are also likely allergic to bee pollen.

Bees Wax

Beeswax

Intended only for external use, beeswax can be used as a salve for insect bites (including bee stings) and burns.

Blackberry

Blackberry

The leaves, roots and bark of the blackberry plant can be crushed and used as a tea or a gargle. As a tea, it works to reduce inflammation, boost metabolis and alleviate diarrhea. As a gargle, it provides relief and helps to treat sore throats, inflamed gums and mouth ulcers.

Black Raspberry

Black Raspberry

The roots of the black raspberry plan can be either boiled and chewed, or crushed and used as a tea. It helps to alleviate coughs, diarrhea and intestinal discomfort.

Buckwheat

Buckwheat

Buckwheat seeds have been found to help lower blood pressure, alleviate diarrhea and aid in blood clotting. The seeds can be added to porridge or soup.

Cayenne

Cayenne

As a powder, Cayenne is good for wounds helping to increase blood flow, acting as an antiseptic, and working as an anesthetic to ease pain. When taken with food, or used in a tea, it is a powerful pain reliever, and can help to alleviate digestive inflammation and arthritis.

Chamomile

Chamomile

When the leaves and flowers are used as a tea, chamomile is an all natural sleep aid. It also helps to treat nausea and intestinal problems.

Chokecherry

Chokecherry

The chokecherry was considered by the Native American tribes to be an all-purpose medicinal treatment. As a salve or poultice, it was used to heal burnt, broken skin. When the berries were pitted, dried and crushed into a tea, it would help to aid in body distress like coughs, colds, flu, diarrhea, nausea and inflammation.

Caution: The pit of the chokecherry is poisonous when consumed in high amounts. Take extra caution to ensure that you pit the cherries if you are planning to use them.

Echinacea

Echinacea

Echinacea was used as an antiseptic and common treatment for colds, cough and flu. It has been found to strengthen the immune system as well as fight fever and infections.

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus

Still found in a variety of cough drops available in drug stores today, the oil from the leaves and roots of the eucalyptus plant was often added to tea to treat sore throats, coughs, fever and flu.

Fennel

Fennel

When used as a poultice, fennel provides eye relief and relief of headaches. When used in a tea, or chewed, it has the ability to treat sore-throats, provide relief from coughs, aid digestion, treat colds and relieve diarrhea.

Feverfew

Feverfew

Feverfew was a commonly used treatment for fever, severe headaches and migraines. It is also used to for relief of joint and muscle pains, asthma and digestive problems.

Feverwort

Feverwort

Feverwort can be added to a tea, chewed, or crushed to create a paste for use as a salve or poultice. It is used for general pain, joint stiffness and itching.

Ginger Root

Ginger Root

Ginger root has anti-inflammatory properties and improves blood circulation. When crushed and mixed in with food, tea or salve it can be used to relieve colds, joint pain, bronchitis, coughs and flu as well as improve digestive health.

Ginseng

Ginseng

As a food additive, or added to a tea or poultice, the roots are used to enhance liver and lung function, boost energy, strengthen immunity and treat fatigue.

Goldenrod

Goldenrod

Goldenrod can be used as an antiseptic for scrapes and minor cuts. When made into a tea, a topical salve or a food additive it is used to treat bronchitis, the flue, chest congestion, inflammation, sore throat and the common cold.

Caution: Goldenrod has come to be recognized as a common allergy in today’s society.

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle

Containing a good amount of anti-inflammatory properties, the stems, flowers, berries and leaves were largely used to treat bee stings and skin infections. When made into a tea, it is also used to treat sore throat, headaches and colds.

Hops

Hops

When mixed with other herbs or plants, like aloe, hops can be used as a muscle relaxer. It can be made into a tea to treat digestive illnesses, sore throats and toothaches.

Licorice

Licorice

The root of the licorice plant has the ability to alleviate pain from toothaches. The roots and leaves can be made into a tea to treat coughs, colds and sore throats.

Note from Angel4Light:

If you decide to forge for wild herbs, be really sure that you have properly identified the plant before you use it. As we know the Demons have duplicated many of God’s Healing blessings with poisonous ones. For example licorice looks very similar to poison sumac.

Your best bet is to forge during the spring and summer or when the plant produces it’s flowers.

Hopefully you will be a pro at spotting all these wonderful healing herbs in no time.

If you are interested in growing a natural herb garden with wild flowers and these great herbs, there are nurseries that specialize in exotic and wild plants.

It is always best to grow your own, getting back to nature and teaching these life skills to your children is a great bonding experience and will be an skill that can be passed down through your family with pride.

Nameste

Mullin

Mullein

Native Americans used mullein to treat a variety of respiratory problems including coughs and congestion.

Passion Flower

Passion Flower

When made into a poultice, the passion flower is a great treatment for skin injuries like burns, insect bites and boils. The leaves and roots can be made into a tea for the treatment of muscle pain and anxiety.

Red Clover

Red Clover

The flowers, root and leaves of the red clover can be added to tea, or used as a food topping. It has been used to alleviate inflammation, improve blood circulation and treat respiratory illnesses.

Rose Hips

Rose Hip

Rose hip is a red/orange berry that comes from roses, which can be eaten whole, crushed into a tea or added to food. It will treat inflammation, intestinal distress, cough and colds. It can also be used for its antiseptic properties.

Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary makes a great general cleanser for the body’s metabolism. It can also be used in food or tea to treat muscle pain and improve circulation.

Sage

Sage

Found growing across North America, sage act as a natural insect repellent. It can also be used for sore throats, colds and digestive problems.

Spearmint

Spearmint

Spearmint has been found to improve blood circulation and eliminate diarrhea. It is also commonly used for treating colds, respiratory issues and coughs.

Valerian

Valerian

The roof of the Valerian can be added to tea to relieve muscle aches and pains.

White Pine

White Pine

Both the inner bark of the white pine and its needles can be infused in a tea. This tea was regularly used to treat respiratory illnesses and chest congestion.

» Source
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The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods

The 10 worst toxins hidden in vitamins, supplements and health foods

By Mike Adams

(NaturalNews) I’m absolutely shocked at how many people don’t investigate what’s really in the products they swallow. When something is sold as an herb, vitamin, superfood or supplement, they think it’s automatically safe. And while the natural products industry has a truly remarkable safety record — especially in contrast to the massive number of deaths caused by pharmaceuticals — it still suffers from a lot of hidden toxins that are routinely used throughout the industry.

I know this because I’ve been an investigative journalist and activist in the natural health industry for over a decade. Natural News is arguably the most-read natural health news website in the world, reaching millions of readers a month. I’ve walked the floors of countless trade shows, conducted hundreds of interviews and spent tens of thousands of dollars on laboratory tests to determine what’s in these products. On top of that, I’m deep into organic product formulations and certified organic food production, serving as the supervisor of a USDA-certified organic food production and packing facility.

When I look around the natural products industry, I see examples of super honest, high-integrity companies like Nature’s Path and Dr. Bronner’s. I also see an alarming number of cheats, crooks and charlatans who are only involved in the industry to profit from the explosion of interest in health supplements. In truth, some nutritional products are downright dangerous to your health. My role as a journalist and activist is to help you tell the difference between products that are GOOD for you vs. products that might actually be toxic. Because ultimately, I want you to be healthy, vibrant, intelligent and active. I want you to enjoy life and improve the quality of your life.

Be prepared to be shocked in reading what follows. After reviewing this list, you will probably throw out quite a few products in your refrigerator and pantry. Very few people are willing to tell you the truth revealed here, so some of this may come as a complete shock (see #1 and #2, below).

Let’s start out with the big one first: If you pick up a natural product and the ingredients list says “maltodextrin,” chances are very high that the maltodextrin in the product is derived from Monsanto’s GM corn.

Virtually all the maltodextrin used throughout the natural products industry is genetically modified. Products that are certified USDA organic, however, are not using GMO maltodextrin.

The non-GMO, non-corn replacement for maltodextrin derived from GM corn is tapioca maltodextrin, and you’ll find tapioca starch / maltodextrin in many certified organic, non-GMO products. Corn maltodextrin should be avoided unless it’s certified USDA organic. Look for tapioca maltodextrin instead (or no maltodextrin at all).

Here’s another whopper that’s sure to open some eyes: Nearly all the “vitamin C” sold in vitamins across America right now is derived from GMO corn.

This means that many of the supplements sold at Whole Foods, the vitamins sold on Amazon.com, the pills at your local pharmacy, and especially the products at the grocery store are (nearly) all routinely made with genetically modified vitamin C. It’s typically called “ascorbic acid,” and nearly 100% of the ascorbic acid used in the natural products industry is derived from GMOs.

Sourcing non-GMO vitamin C requires you to go outside the United States. There is no existing supply chain of certified organic, non-GMO ascorbic acid available anywhere in America (at least not to my knowledge). You can’t even run batches of non-GMO ascorbic acid production in the USA because all the facilities are contaminated with residues of GM corn.

Rest assured that all those cheap “vitamin C” pills sold at retail are derived from genetically modified corn.

Nearly 100% of the “natural” soy proteins sold in the USA are extracted in China using a hexane extraction method. Anything from China should be double checked for metals content just to make sure it’s all clean. This is true across the board for all food products from China, not just brown rice protein. We have consistently found nutritional products from China to be contaminated with worrisome levels of metals, which is why I personally won’t put my brand name on anything from China other than a few exceptions that are well-tested such as goji berries (grown in the Himalayas). The Axiom company says their brown rice protein tests completely clean, but until I run those tests myself, I can’t say for sure whether I concur with the claims.

What the industry really needs right now is a U.S. manufacturer of brown rice protein, for which a multi-million dollar market already exists. If Axiom would find a certified organic U.S. grower for its brown rice protein, the company would receive a huge endorsement from Natural News and probably find a whole new wave of demand from consumers who want U.S. grown products. Texas, by the way, produces a lot of organic brown rice. Surely there must be a way to extract the protein in America and not have to go all the way to China to find this.

On the issue of soy protein, no one disputes the fact that it’s routinely extracted with hexane. Here’s a list of many of the protein bar brands currently using soy protein:
https://www.naturalnews.com/032862_soy_protei…

Hexane is a highly explosive chemical. It is not only extremely hazardous to the environment, there may also be trace amounts of hexane left remaining in the resulting protein products. My understanding is that hexane extraction is not allowed in certified organic proteins, so if you have a choice, go for certified organic instead of just “natural” (which means nothing anyway).

Hexane extraction, by the way, is also used in the manufacture of textured vegetable protein (TVP). Read more about TVP here:
https://www.naturalnews.com/033728_TVP_textur…

Natural News helped expose high aluminum levels (over 1200ppm) in a popular detox liquid, causing the main U.S. distributor to issue a “recall” notice and provide over $1 million in refunds to customers.

The manufacturer of this product, Adya Clarity, intentionally and knowingly deceived consumers by mislabeling the product and not mentioning the 1200ppm of aluminum it contained. The FDA seized some of the products and ran its own lab tests, confirming the high aluminum level as well as identifying multiple labeling violations.

Adya Clarity is just one of many so-called “detox” products containing alarming levels of aluminum and other metals. Ingesting these in order to “detox” your body may be harmful to your health. This experience also proves you can’t always trust health products sold through online webinars, where manufacturers can ignore labeling laws and fabricate false claims. Buyer beware when it comes to metals in detox products that claim seemingly magical results.

China is the most polluted nation on the planet (by far), yet many fruits, vegetables and herbs are grown in China and exported to North America for use in natural products.

High levels of lead and arsenic are routinely found in various food, supplement and herbal products from China. I’m not concerned about 1ppm or lower, by the way, of heavy metals like lead and mercury. Even aluminum isn’t necessarily a problem when found organically grown inside foods that test at higher levels such as 150ppm. But when lead, arsenic, mercury and cadmium get to high saturation levels (or are present in inorganic forms), it makes the products potentially a source of heavy metals poisoning for consumers.

Astonishingly, many of the small and medium-sized companies that import and retail products from China conduct no metals testing whatsoever. I know this as a fact because I’ve talked to people doing this.

For the record, everything packed under my own brand name (Health Ranger Select) and sold at the Natural News Store is independently tested by us to ensure full product safety and regulatory compliance.

Would you eat iron filings and call it nutrition? The majority of people don’t know that most of the cheap vitamins sold today are made with iron filings. “Scrap metal,” almost.

The calcium found in cheap vitamins is often just ground-up seashells, and magnesium is often sold as cheap magnesium oxide which may be completely useless to your body’s cells. If you’re buying mineral supplements, you may be wasting your money unless the minerals are in the right form: Magnesium orotate or malate, for example.

When it comes to mineral supplements, you’ll often find trace levels of scary things like barium and lead in liquid supplements, but these are typically at such low levels (ppb) that they are no real concern. But the No. 1 best source for all minerals is, not surprisingly, fresh plants. If you really want to boost your minerals, feed ’em to sprouts or garden plants, then eat or juice those plants. Your body wants “organic” minerals from plants, not inorganic minerals from rocks.

The Cornucopia Institute, a highly-effective food activism group that we’ve long supported, recently published a warning about carrageenan in foods. Cornucopia says carrageenan is linked to “gastrointestinal inflammation, including higher rates of colon cancer, in laboratory animals.”

It goes on to report:

Given its effect on gastrointestinal inflammation, Cornucopia urges anyone suffering from gastrointestinal symptoms (irritable bowel syndrome/IBS, spastic colon, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic diarrhea, etc.) to consider completely eliminating carrageenan from the diet to determine if carrageenan was a factor in causing the symptoms.

Personally, I have never had any problem with carrageenan, and given that it’s derived from seaweed, I also didn’t mind the source. I actually consume quite a lot of carrageenan in Blue Diamond almond milk, which I drink when I’m too busy to make my own raw almond milk. And I’ve never had a problem with it whatsoever. So from my personal experience, I don’t see carrageenan as a worrisome ingredient, but I do understand that some people experience it differently, and it may be troublesome for people whose digestive systems are more sensitive than my own.

For the record, I definitely don’t consider carrageenan to be anywhere near as worrisome as, say, aspartame, GMOs or MSG.

Acrylamides are cancer-causing chemicals produced during the cooking of carbohydrates. Fried snack chips, for example, contain acrylamides. They don’t have to be listed on labels because they are technically not “ingredients.” They are chemicals produced during cooking or frying. Consuming acrylamides increases kidney cancer risk by 59 percent.

The FDA has published an extensive reference guide on acrylamide levels in foods, revealing that french fries have the highest levels of all. But they are also present in prune juice and even breakfast cereals.

A bag of organic snack chips can have just as many acrylamides as a bag of conventional snack chips. This is why fried snack chips should be eaten only sparingly, or never at all. I’m guilty of eating some of these chips myself from time to time, but I limit the quantity and make sure I’m taking chlorella or other superfoods at the same time to counteract the acrylamides.

Interestingly, it turns out that vitamin C blocks acrylamides from causing damage to your body. But if your vitamin C is from a GMO source (see above), you may want to rethink that strategy. Natural citrus juice, rose hips or even camu camu berry powder is a much better choice of natural, full-spectrum vitamin C.

If you eat fried foods of any kind, make sure you ingest a lot of vitamin C, astaxanthin and chlorella before and after your meal or snack.

Hidden MSG is a huge issue across the natural products industry. Pick up almost any veggie burger, and you’ll find it’s made with yeast extract, a hidden form of MSG (monosodium glutamate).

Yeast extract is unbelievably prevalent in the food industry because it looks nicer on the label than “MSG.” Most people are trained to avoid MSG, but yeast extract slips by, so food manufacturers put it into canned soups, dip mixes, snack chips, microwave dinners and especially in vegetarian products, many of which are so loaded with chemicals and additives that I won’t dare touch them. Just because a food says “vegetarian” doesn’t mean it’s healthy.

Hidden MSG is also labeled as “autolyzed yeast extract” or “torula yeast” or even “hydrolyzed vegetable protein.”

Green tea is famous for being contaminated with high levels of fluoride. This is frustrating, because green tea is phenomenally good for your health. It has been proven to lower “bad” cholesterol levels, and it may even help prevent cancer and neurological disorders. It’s probably one of the healthiest beverages you can ever drink.

The tea plant that produces green tea just happens to uptake a huge amount of fluoride from the soils. So when there’s fluoride present in those soils, the green tea will have a surprisingly high concentration, sometimes as much as 25ppm.

An interesting article on this issue is found at Toxipedia.org:
http://toxipedia.org/display/toxipedia/Fluor…

While this fluoride in green tea might not be a health hazard all by itself, the governments of the world seem insistent on pumping even more synthetic, chemical fluoride into the water supplies, thereby creating a high risk for fluorosis. Adding green tea to the fluoride consumption you might experience from tap water is a recipe for disaster: brittle bones, discoloration of teeth and even cancer.

Finally, there’s one more secret you need to know about. Most importers, packers, vendors and retailers of natural products foolishly trust the lab results provided by the manufacturers and exporters!

So a typical U.S. company that sells, for example, pomegranate powder on the internet may never conduct their own tests for lead, mercury, cadmium, arsenic and aluminum. They will simply take the lab tests provided by the manufacturer and consider those to be absolute fact!

This is extraordinarily foolish. Growers and exporters routinely lie about their lab tests in order to pull the wool over the eyes of importers, formulators and retailers. The lab tests are easily faked or simply bought off in their home country. Contaminated products can be easily sold and exported because the FDA doesn’t routinely check imported raw materials for heavy metals contamination.

On the good news side, I do know for a fact that all the higher-end retailers such as Natural News, Mercola, Gary Null, etc., all routinely test their raw materials for contaminants. I’m pretty sure Gaia herbs (www.GaiaHerbs.com) routinely tests all their batches, and I know that VitaCost, before it changed hands a few years ago, was running their own lab to test raw materials on-site (for their in-house formulations). But I also know of smaller retailers who absolutely do not test anything and are far more interested in moving boxes than knowing what’s really in them. I also know that some operations are claiming to sell “organic” products even though they do not have any kind of organic certification, and that’s an irresponsible practice that should be rectified. (Look for the USDA organic logo when you buy “organic” products. If they don’t have the logo, they aren’t really organic.)

So once again, buyer beware. You need to be asking for lab test results on anything from China, and it’s good to ask for them on just about everything else as well. For our part, Natural News Store is already in the process of building a mechanism where we can post lab results for all the batches we import, pack and retail. We reject anything with high levels of metals, which is why it took us so many months to secure a really clean source of chlorella.

About the author: Mike Adams (aka the “Health Ranger”) is a best selling author (#1 best selling science book on Amazon.com) and a globally recognized scientific researcher in clean foods. He serves as the founding editor of NaturalNews.com and the lab science director of an internationally accredited (ISO 17025) analytical laboratory known as CWC Labs. There, he was awarded a Certificate of Excellence for achieving extremely high accuracy in the analysis of toxic elements in unknown water samples using ICP-MS instrumentation. Adams is also highly proficient in running liquid chromatography, ion chromatography and mass spectrometry time-of-flight analytical instrumentation.

Adams is a person of color whose ancestors include Africans and Native American Indians. He’s also of Native American heritage, which he credits as inspiring his “Health Ranger” passion for protecting life and nature against the destruction caused by chemicals, heavy metals and other forms of pollution.

Adams is the founder and publisher of the open source science journal Natural Science Journal, the author of numerous peer-reviewed science papers published by the journal, and the author of the world’s first book that published ICP-MS heavy metals analysis results for foods, dietary supplements, pet food, spices and fast food. The book is entitled Food Forensics and is published by BenBella Books.

In his laboratory research, Adams has made numerous food safety breakthroughs such as revealing rice protein products imported from Asia to be contaminated with toxic heavy metals like lead, cadmium and tungsten. Adams was the first food science researcher to document high levels of tungsten in superfoods. He also discovered over 11 ppm lead in imported mangosteen powder, and led an industry-wide voluntary agreement to limit heavy metals in rice protein products.

In addition to his lab work, Adams is also the (non-paid) executive director of the non-profit Consumer Wellness Center (CWC), an organization that redirects 100% of its donations receipts to grant programs that teach children and women how to grow their own food or vastly improve their nutrition. Through the non-profit CWC, Adams also launched Nutrition Rescue, a program that donates essential vitamins to people in need. Click here to see some of the CWC success stories.

With a background in science and software technology, Adams is the original founder of the email newsletter technology company known as Arial Software. Using his technical experience combined with his love for natural health, Adams developed and deployed the content management system currently driving NaturalNews.com. He also engineered the high-level statistical algorithms that power SCIENCE.naturalnews.com, a massive research resource featuring over 10 million scientific studies.

Adams is well known for his incredibly popular consumer activism video blowing the lid on fake blueberries used throughout the food supply. He has also exposed “strange fibers” found in Chicken McNuggets, fake academic credentials of so-called health “gurus,” dangerous “detox” products imported as battery acid and sold for oral consumption, fake acai berry scams, the California raw milk raids, the vaccine research fraud revealed by industry whistleblowers and many other topics.

Adams has also helped defend the rights of home gardeners and protect the medical freedom rights of parents. Adams is widely recognized to have made a remarkable global impact on issues like GMOs, vaccines, nutrition therapies, human consciousness.

In addition to his activism, Adams is an accomplished musician who has released over a dozen popular songs covering a variety of activism topics.

17 Incredible Health Benefits Of Green Tea

17 Incredible Health Benefits Of Green Tea

by EraOfLight

People have been drinking infusions of tea for thousands of years, beginning in China and India. Today, tea is consumed more widely than any other beverage in the world except water. Billions of people drink tea, and a large number of studies show tea to have many health benefits.

There are three main varieties of tea: green, black, and oolong. All three varieties are made from the leaves of the same species of plant called Camellia sinensis; the difference is in how the tea leaves are processed.

Green tea is made from unfermented leaves, while oolong tea is made from partially fermented leaves and black tea is fully fermented.Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages you can consume. It’s sugar free, doesn’t have any calories, and is loaded with antioxidants that provide copious health benefits. Plus, it’s refreshing. What’s not to like?

Green tea contains a number of bioactive compounds including caffeine and other alkaloids, polyphenols, and Vitamin K, and after steeping many of the bioactive compounds in the tea leaves effuse into the final drink.

The main stimulants in green tea include caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. On the other hand, L-theanine, an amino acid found in green tea, has a calming effect on the nervous system. So green tea can have a mildly stimulating but also relaxing effect at the same time.

Green tea also contains a high concentration of powerful antioxidants called polyphenols. In fact, many of the health properties of green tea are attributed to its polyphenol content.

Green tea has a higher polyphenol content than black or oolong, as fermenting tea leaves lowers the polyphenol content.

The polyphenols in green tea, which include multiple subcategories of polyphenols like flavonoids and catechins, can reduce the formation of free radicals in the body, protecting cells, molecules, and other structures from damage. One of the most active and powerful antioxidant polyphenols in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG).

EGCG has been studied to treat a wide variety of diseases and may be one of the main reasons green tea has such powerful medicinal properties. Beyond EGCG, other polyphenol catechins in green tea include catechin, gallocatechin, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, and epicatechin gallate.

Tea leaves contain a higher percentage of caffeine by weight than coffee beans. However, because a lot less tea leaves are used to make tea than coffee beans are used to make coffee, a cup of tea has significantly less caffeine than a cup of coffee.

Drinking green tea has a long list of benefits. In fact, research shows it can help you:

While the stimulants in tea can keep you awake, they can also make your brain function better. The main stimulant, caffeine, is present in tea at enough of a dose to provide a lift for most people without causing the increased anxiety and “jitters” associated with too much coffee.

In the brain, the main method of action of caffeine is to block adenosine receptors, allowing neurons to fire for longer, increasing brain activity. Studies have shown caffeine improves concentration and memory.

Additionally, the amino aide L-theanine has a relaxing effect while simultaneously increasing alertness, which, in combination with caffeine, can increase brain function and help you be more productive.

Not only can drinking green tea improve brain function in the short term, it may also protect your brain in the long term. In particular, data show it may help stave off Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common neurodegenerative disease and a leading cause of dementia.

Parkinson’s disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, resulting in the death of dopamine-producing neurons in the brain.

Multiple studies show that the antioxidant catechins in green tea can have a protective effect on neurons, potentially lowering your risk of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Clinical studies suggest that green tea may boost your metabolism and help you burn fat. Green tea can also help you lose weight and lower your risk of becoming overweight or obese.

Much of this effect is likely due to caffeine, but other compounds in tea may also contribute to this effect. By helping you selectively burn the fat you have stored in your body for energy, green tea may help you feel fuller and maintain a more steady energy level, resulting in less hunger cravings and less calories consumed.

In particular, one randomized controlled 12 week study of 240 men and women showed the group that received green tea extract had significant decreases in body weight, body fat percentage, body fat mass, waist circumference, hip circumference, and areas of fat throughout the body.

Type II diabetes is a disease that has reached epidemic proportions over the past few decades and now afflicts hundreds of millions of people worldwide. And yet, it is almost completely preventable and mostly reversible in its early stages by strictly cutting the intake of sugar (carbohydrates).

Diabetics lose their sensitivity to insulin, which means insulin is less effective in signaling to cells to absorb sugar from the blood stream, resulting in both higher blood sugar and higher blood insulin levels. Because both sugar and insulin are damaging to the cardiovascular system, over time many adverse effects result. (The more sensitive you are to insulin, and in general the lower your normal blood sugar level, the better.)

Green tea can lower and help stabilize your blood sugar levels (glucose levels); in fact, studies show that green tea can even improve insulin sensitivity and reduce blood sugar levels.

One study among Japanese individuals found that those who drank the most green tea had a very significantly lower risk of developing type II diabetes. Other studies have shown similar results.

Cardiovascular diseases, which lump heart disease, stroke, and other diseases of the heart and blood vessels caused by atherosclerosis and hypertension (high blood pressure) into one category, are the most prevalent causes of death in the world.

Studies show that green tea can improve some of the main risk factors for these diseases, which includes helping regulate total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. One method by which green tea might help: it significantly increases the antioxidant levels of your blood, protecting LDL cholesterol particles from oxidation – one of the causes of heart disease.

Studies have shown green tea drinkers have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease. Other studies show that black tea has similar effects. In fact, researchers estimate that the rate of heart attack decreases measurably with the consumption of just a few cups of tea per day.

Research also shows that green tea lowers total cholesterol, improving the overall cholesterol profile. One population-based clinical study found that men who drink green tea are more likely to have lower total cholesterol than those who do not drink green tea.

Other clinical studies that look at populations of people indicate that the antioxidant properties of green tea may help prevent atherosclerosis, particularly coronary artery disease.

The benefits also seem to extend to preventing stroke, reducing high blood pressure, and inhibiting the formation of blood clots. Much of the effect may also be due to the ability of green tea to help lower blood sugar and insulin levels.

Green tea also seems to boost physical performance, increase exercise endurance, and decrease reaction time, and there are many, many such studies showing these effects from caffeine, although other ingredients in green tea may aid this effect.

Caffeine, and green tea’s, ability to mobilize fatty acids in fat tissue to make them more easily available for use as energy also seems to aid physical performance. In one study, caffeine was shown to significantly increase physical performance (exercise endurance and exertion).

The antioxidants in green tea may also help prevent tissue damage during physical exertion as well.

Several population-based clinical studies have shown that both green and black teas may help protect against cancer. Early clinical studies suggest that the polyphenols in tea, especially green tea, may play an important role in the prevention of cancer.

Researchers also believe that polyphenols help kill cancerous cells and stop them from growing.

It is well known that oxidative damage contributes to the development of cancer and that antioxidants can have a protective effect. Green tea is an excellent source of powerful antioxidants, so it’s logical that tea could reduce your risk of cancer.

According to the National Cancer Institute, the polyphenols in tea have been shown to decrease tumor growth in both animal and laboratory studies. Researchers believe that it is the high level of polyphenols in tea that help kill cancerous cells and stop them from growing, although the exact mechanism by which tea inhibits and prevents cancerous cells is uncertain.

A meta-analysis of observational studies found that women who drank the most green tea had a lower risk of developing breast cancer: the most common form of cancer in women.

One large-scale clinical study compared green tea drinkers with non-drinkers and found that those who drank the most tea were less likely to develop pancreatic cancer, particularly women, who were 50% less likely to develop the disease.

Prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men. One study found that men drinking five or more cups of green tea had only about half the risk of developing advanced prostate cancer as those that drank less than one cup per day.

A study of 69,710 Chinese women found that green tea drinkers had a much lower risk of developing colorectal cancer.

While they don’t prove cause and effect, multiple other observational studies have shown that green tea drinkers are significantly less likely to get various types of cancer than those that don’t drink green tea.

Studies have also shown the positive impacts of green tea on bladder, ovarian, esophageal, lung, skin, and stomach cancer.

Furthermore, drinking green tea may help prevent liver disease.

Some studies show that the catechins in green tea can kill bacteria and inhibit viruses like the influenza virus, potentially lowering your risk of infections.

One of the primary species of harmful bacteria in the mouth is Streptococcus mutans. It causes plaque formation and is a leading contributor to cavities and tooth decay. Studies show that the catechins in tea can inhibit the growth of Streptococcus mutans.

In general, green tea consumption is associated with improved dental health and a lower risk of dental caries.

On top of that, another benefit of green tea is that it can reduce bad breath.

Since some of the bioactive compounds in green tea are anti-viral and anti-bacterial, in much the same way as green tea can kill bacteria in your mouth, it can also inhibit bacteria and viruses in your bloodstream and throughout the rest of your body.

Similarly, green tea may inhibit viral and bacterial infection via your nasal passages. All this means is that green tea may help prevent colds and the flu, and furthermore seems to be able to alleviate the symptoms of colds and the flu once you are sick.

Some data have shown green tea can aid digestion, improve bowel health, and reduce IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease). Green tea may act by reducing inflammation in the gut associated with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, the two types of IBD.

There is some data to suggest drinking green tea may make your bones stronger. This may be because it is alkaline-forming in your body, helping prevent the leaching of minerals from your bones to counteract blood acidity and maintain proper blood pH.

Tea doesn’t dehydrate. Even though it is a commonly-held belief that anything with caffeine is dehydrating, this is false.

Yes, caffeine is a diuretic, but water is also a diuretic. The volume of water of a cup of tea overcomes any dehydrating effect from the caffeine in the tea.

In fact, it would take an excessive amount of caffeine in a drink to dehydrate. The amount of water in tea, and even coffee, makes these drinks hydrating; substantiating this point, tests have shown that tea is not significantly different than water in the maintenance of hydration.

So why not have a cup of tea: a terrifically hydrating drink of water with healthy compounds mixed in to boot?

The amino acid L-theanine in green tea increases the activity of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, which has anti-anxiety effects.

L-theanine also increases dopamine and the production of alpha waves in the brain, aiding relaxation, decreasing stress, and helping reduce depression.

Some of the compounds in green tea are anti-inflammatory, and there is evidence to suggest their anti-inflammatory effects can improve the symptoms of arthritis.

Green tea can prevent wrinkles and the signs of aging because the antioxidants in green tea are able to fight free-radical damage. Similarly, the anti-inflammatory properties of green tea can help prevent damage to skin from all sorts of harmful environmental stressors.

Additionally, green tea can help relieve psoriasis by reducing the redness and irritation that comes with it; green tea has also been shown to reduce the redness that comes with rosacea.

The polyphenols in green tea, especially EGCG, have been shown to have a particularly powerful effect in supporting skin cells and cellular DNA in the presence of sunlight.

Many different clinical studies have shown EGCG to help promote the skin’s defenses against the sun’s rays. And because these polyphenols accumulate in the skin, regularly drinking green tea or taking a green tea supplement with EGCG can act as supplemental protection.

Drinking green tea can lead to a higher quality life and a reduced risk of dying from any cause. Of course, since green tea drinkers are at a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and various cancers over a given period of time, it makes sense that green tea could help you live longer.

In a decade-long study of Japanese adults, death from all causes together, and also death from specifically heart disease and stroke, were all reduced in both women and men who drank the most green tea (5 or more cups per day) versus those who drank less than one cup per day.

Another study found that those who drank the most green tea were 76% less likely to die during the 6 year study period.

Of course drink it: it’s best to consume green tea that you make from loose-leaf tea leaves. But there are also powders and supplements you can take, such as green tea extract, that contain some or all of the active ingredients.

When drinking green tea, just be sure you don’t add sugar, which could undo the positive benefits of your cup of tea. And milk may reduce the antioxidant capacity of tea.The more you can use green tea to replace other sweet drinks–like soft drinks, energy drinks, and sugary beverages–the better!

Green tea contains tannins, which can decrease the absorption of iron and folic acid. As such, it may be better for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding to abstain.

People who are anemic should be careful drinking tea around mealtime.

Those taking anticoagulant drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) should drink green tea with caution due to its vitamin K content, which is necessary for blood coagulation.

People who have anxiety or are very sensitive to caffeine should also be cautious drinking green tea.

Studies in laboratory animals have found that green tea polyphenols inhibit the growth of esophageal cancer cells (in line with its anti-cancer properties).

Other clinical studies have found that green tea offers protection against the development of esophageal cancer, particularly among women.

However, one large-scale population-based clinical study found just the opposite: drinking green tea was associated with an increased risk of esophageal cancer, and the stronger and hotter the tea, the greater the risk. It seems that if the water is very hot, it can damage the esophagus and lead to long-term adverse consequences. So just make sure the tea you drink isn’t extremely hot.

Feel better, lose weight, lower your risk of chronic diseases, and be healthier by making green tea a regular part of your life!

Source

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Hemp Makes Great Plastic, So Why Isn’t Hemp Plastic Everywhere?

Hemp Makes Great Plastic, So Why Isn’t Hemp Plastic Everywhere?

by EraOfLight

cannabis plant

Plastic is an inescapable part of our everyday lives, so why is almost all of it still made from polluting, non-renewable petrochemicals? You may have heard that agricultural hemp, the non-mind-altering cousin of cannabis (commonly known as marijuana), has dozens of potential uses from clothing to paper.

Since virtually all climate scientists agree that we must replace our dependence on fossil fuels, and given that hemp can even make the soil cleaner, it’s surprising that this miracle crop isn’t in wider use.

When we looked into the topic, we found that hemp is already appearing in some commonplace objects, including cars, and could soon find its way into more. But there are also remaining barriers that keep hemp plastics more expensive and less versatile, for now.

plastic pollution

Not only are the harmful effects of global warming increasingly clear, conventional plastics linger in the environment and can even enter the food chain to detrimental effect on human and animal health.

In one especially shocking recent example, researchers from the University of Tasmania and the UK’s Royal Society for the Protection of Birds found 38 million pieces of plastic waste on Henderson Island, an uninhabited coral island in the South Pacific.

“I’ve travelled to some of the most far-flung islands in the world and regardless of where I’ve gone, in what year, and in what area of the ocean, the story is generally the same: the beaches are littered with evidence of human activity,” Jennifer Lavers, a marine scientist from the University of Tasmania, told The Guardian.

The oceans are in a similar or even worse state, thanks to the risk of microplastics, or tiny fragments of plastic that pollute the waters and are often eaten by marine life. The infamous “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” is actually largely composed of millions of these tiny particles — as much as 1.9 million per square mile — according to a 2014 report from National Geographic.

Some of the earliest plastics were made from cellulose fibers obtained from organic, non-petroleum-based sources.

“Hemp cellulose can be extracted and used to make cellophane, rayon, celluloid and a range of related plastics,” reported Seshata, a writer at Sensi Seeds in 2014. “Hemp is known to contain around 65-70% cellulose, and is considered a good source (wood contains around 40%, flax 65-75%, and cotton up to 90%) that has particular promise due to its relative sustainability and low environmental impact.”

While 100% hemp-based plastic is still a rarity, some “composite bioplastics” — plastics made from a combination of hemp and other plant sources — are already in use. Thanks to their high strength and rigidity, these plastics are currently used in the construction of cars, boats, and even musical instruments.
could hemp be used for plastic bottles

Many plastic products are made from polymer resins, including polyethylene terephthalate, or PET, found in everyday products like plastic bottles. While advocates hope to someday see 100% hemp-based plastic bottles on supermarket shelves, the technology just isn’t ready for prime time.

Companies like Coca-Cola have experimented with 100% plant-based bottles, but commercially available products are made from no more than 30% plant-based materials, while the remainder is made from traditional fossil fuel sources.

The good news is that many corporations are investing heavily in researching replacements to traditional PET. It’s likely the first company to produce a viable commercial product could stand to earn millions.

Unfortunately, even plastic that’s deliberately designed to be biodegradable can still be a source of pollution. Almost nothing biodegrades in a landfill, and hemp microplastics could still cause problems when introduced to the oceans. Biodegradable plastics need to be sent to commercial composting facilities for efficient disposal, and these facilities aren’t available to everyone. In addition to creating better alternatives to plastic, we’ll still to create more responsible attitudes toward disposable products.

While fossil fuel costs are kept low with subsidies, hemp products for the most part remain costly luxury items. While some hemp is grown in the United States under pilot programs legalized by the 2014 Farm Bill, most is still imported from other countries.

Though hemp requires fewer pesticides and has a smaller environmental footprint than many other crops, growing and harvesting it remains labor intensive. Another drawback is that hemp requires “significant fertilizer in some soils, and also has relatively high water requirements,” as noted by Seshata.

However, hemp prices would almost undoubtedly come down, and technology improve, if we ended the war on drugs — particularly the many restrictions on legally growing hemp and cannabis.

One of the most provocative examples of hemp’s potential plastic future could come from LEGOs, the ubiquitous building block toy. which is promising to phase out fossil-fuel based resin by 2030.

“Hemp might just be the cost effective, environmentally sustainable alternative material that LEGO is looking for,” speculated Emily Gray Brosious in a February 2016 investigation from the Sun Times.

Whether or not we’re ever able to build a spaceship from hemp bricks, the full promise of hemp plastic remains tantalizingly close, but just out of reach.

Source

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EMF Damage ~ SHUNGITE to the RESCUE!

EMF Damage ~ SHUNGITE to the RESCUE!

EMFs Damage Mitochondria and Break Apart DNA

Unlike ionizing radiation that produces damage by heating up tissues, low-level radiation in the radio frequency and microwave part of the spectrum causes biological effects without raising temperatures.

According to EMF expert Martin Blank, PhD, these frequencies “stress” cellular proteins in human cells. This may explain many of their harmful effects such as inflammation, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. [8]

EMFs have been shown to cause serious mitochondrial dysfunction from free radical damage. Mitochondria are the little energy powerhouses inside our cells. Free radical damage is linked to anxiety, dementia, autism, ADHD, cardiac arrhythmias, depression, and infertility.

Dr. Martin Pall of Washington State University has published a number of papers about the mechanisms by which EMFs inflict damage to plants, animals and humans. He has concluded that EMFs damage voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC), allowing calcium to flood into your cells. This triggers a biochemical cascade resulting in massive numbers of free radicals that damage your cell membranes and mitochondria, break your DNA, accelerate aging, and drive up your risk for chronic disease.[9]

Rates of chronic disease are soaring. Since 1990, we have seen an explosion of autoimmune, neurological and metabolic diseases. Alzheimer’s has increased by 299 percent, depression by 280 percent, and chronic fatigue by a staggering 11027 percent.[10] Many experts speculate that mitochondrial damage from EMFs is a major factor.

EMFs are now directly associated with the following:

• Reproductive effects (e.g., reduced sperm count and motility, reduced fertility)
• DNA damage and oxidative stress
• Brain cancer
• Cognitive problems (impaired reaction time, memory, brain fog)

• Insomnia
• Fatigue and malaise
• Tachycardia
• Digestive disturbances
• Cataracts

Shungite for Inflammation, Immune Function & Detoxification

The Karelians have utilized fullerenes for centuries without knowing what they were. It’s believed the healing properties of the spring water that flows through shungite outcrops is a result of the fullerenes. Shungite is one of nature’s gifts for cleansing the environment, but it may have equally impressive effects for cleansing our bodies. Shungite can be consumed orally or applied topically via shungite water, or the stones can be worn on or close to the body.

Thanks to shungite’s unique structure, it grabs onto many different things including chemicals, volatile organic compounds, drugs, chlorine, fluoride, and radioactive particles. It also kills a wide variety of bacteria, viruses, phages and other pathogens.[20]

Shungite can neutralize a significant number of toxins because it holds a massive quantity of hydrogen, making it very effective for water purification.

• Inflammation
• Elimination of free radicals (antioxidant effects, reduced cellular damage)
• Antibacterial and antiviral
• Antihistamine (suppressing allergies)
• Anticancer (slowing cancer cell growth)
• Pain reliever
• Immune booster, faster healing and tissue regeneration
• Protection from ionizing radiation, non-ionizing radiation (including EMFs), geopathic stress
• Enhanced detoxification
• Benefits reported for high blood pressure, osteoarthritis, respiratory tract infections, diabetes, gastrointestinal conditions, skin conditions such as psoriasis, and faster recovery for cancer patients following radiation therapy

Patriot Intel Report ~ WARNING! 06-14-19

Patriot Intel Report ~ WARNING! 06-14-19

by Patriot Intel Report

Published on Jun 14, 2019

Help support Patriot Intel Report by using our PayPal.Me
link: https://paypal.me/PhoenixRisingRadio

NOW is the Time for YOU to take action! Become a prayer Warrior Anon invite you to become a FREE member at https://prayersfor45.com

Also check out our website http://www.patriotintelreport.com

Note from Angel4Light:

Please listen to the entire video. Share with others and prepare for the change.

Nameste

Open Sesame! 10 Amazing Health Benefits Of This Super-Seed

Open Sesame! 10 Amazing Health Benefits Of This Super-Seed

Given the growing body of scientific support on its health benefits, sesame would be just as at home in a medicine cabinet as it would be a kitchen cupboard.

Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world, prized as an oilseed for at least 5,000 years. While it is beginning to regain favor due to its exceptionally high calcium and magnesium content, few realize it is also one of the most potent medicinal foods still commonly consumed today.

In fact, its history as a medicine goes back 3600 years to Egyptian times where it was listed in the scrolls of the Ebers as a favored medicine. Also, women in ancient Babylon were believed to use a mixture of honey and sesame seeds (havla) to prolong youth and beauty, and Roman soldiers ate the mixture for strength and energy.

In the past twenty years, a glut of scientific information has poured in demonstrating that sesame seed, and its components, have over one hundred potential therapeutic applications which you can view at on the GreenMedInfo sesame research page. Given these new revelations, it would seem that sesame would be just as at home in a medicine cabinet as it would be a kitchen cupboard.

Here are just 10 evidence-based medicinal properties of this food-medicine:

Diabetes: A study published in 2011 in the Clinical Journal of Nutrition showed that sesame oil improved the effectiveness of the oral antidiabetic drug glibenclamide in type 2 diabetic patients. [1] Another study published in 2006 in the Journal of Medicinal Foods showed that the substitution of sesame seed oil as the sole edible oil lowers blood pressure and glucose in hypertensive diabetics. [2]

High Blood Pressure: A study published in 2006 in the Yale Journal of Biological Medicine showed that sesame seed oil has a beneficial effect in hypertensive patients on either diuretics or beta-blockers. Substitution of all dietary oils with sesame oil brought down systolic and dystolic blood pressure to normal, in addition to decreasing lipid peroxidation (bodily rancidity) and antioxidant status. [3] One of the compounds identified behind sesame seed’s antihypertensive effects are peptides that act as angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitors.[4]

Gingivitis/Dental Plaque: Sesame seed oil has been used for oral health for thousands of years in the traditional Indian medical tradition known as Ayurveda in a process known as “oil pulling.” It involves swishing sesame seed oil in the mouth for prolonged durations and has been said to prevent teeth decay, halitosis, bleeding gums, dry throat, and for strengthening the teeth, gums and jaw. Clinical research now confirms that it compares favorably to chemical mouthwash (chlorhexidine) in improving plaque-induced gingivitis,[5] and that it is capable of reducing Streptococcus mutans growth associated with oral plaque formation. [6]

Infant Health/Massage Oil: A study published in the Indian Journal of Medical Research in 2000 showed that massaging infants with sesame oil improved both their growth and post-massage sleep, in comparison to control oils such as mineral oil.[7]

Multiple Sclerosis (MS): In the animal model of MS, also known as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, sesame seed oil protects mice from developing the disease by reducing IFN-gamma secretion, a key factor in initiating autoimmune inflammation and injury in the nervous system.[8] It has also been research for its potential beneficial role in another neurodegenerative condition, Huntington’s disease. [9]

Antibiotic-Induced Kidney Damage: Sesame seed oil protects against gentamicin-induced kidney damage in rats by reducing oxidative damage caused by the antibiotic.[10]

Atherosclerosis: Sesame seed oil prevents the formation of atherosclerotic lesions in mice fed an atherogenic diet.[11] The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory lignan found within sesame seeds known as sesamol has been identified to be partially responsible for its anti-atherogenic properties. In fact, sesamol has been shown to possess over two dozen beneficial pharmacologically active properties, many of which may contribute to improving cardiovascular health.

Depression: The sesame lignin sesamol was shown to exert an antidepressant-like effect in behavioral despair in chronically stressed mice, specifically by modulating oxidative-nitrosative stress and inflammation.[12]

Radiation-Induced DNA Damage: Sesamol has been shown to protect against gamma radiation-induced DNA damage, likely through its antioxidant properties. [13] It is capable of reducing mortality in radiation treated mice, in part through preventing intestinal and spleen damage.[14] When compared to another powerful antioxidant, melatonin, it was found 20 times more effective as a free radical scavenger.[15]

Cancer: Sesame contains a fat-soluble lignin with phytoestrogenic properties known as sesamin, and which has been studied for inhibiting the proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells, including:

  • Leukemia
  • Multiple Myleoma
  • Colon Cancer
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Breast Cancer
  • Lung Cancer
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Lung Cancer

Sesamin’s anticancer effects have been linked to the NF-kappaB signaling.[16] Sesame’s lignan content my actually be superior to flaxseed — a fact first reported via the GreenMedInfo newsletter.

Sesame deserves to be recognized, along with garlic, honey, turmeric and a select few other substances, as an easily accessible and affordable food-medicine that, if consumed regularly, could quite possibly save lives.

[1] Sesame oil exhibits synergistic effect with anti-diabetic medication in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Clin Nutr. 2011 Jun ;30(3):351-8. Epub 2010 Dec 16. PMID: 21163558

[2] A pilot study of open label sesame oil in hypertensive diabetics. J Med Food. 2006 Fall;9(3):408-12. PMID: 17004907

[3] Effect of sesame oil on diuretics or Beta-blockers in the modulation of blood pressure, anthropometry, lipid profile, and redox status. Yale J Biol Med. 2006 Mar;79(1):19-26. PMID: 17876372

[4] Antihypertensive effect of angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides from a sesame protein hydrolysate in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2006 May;70(5):1118-26. PMID: 16717411

[5] Effect of oil pulling on plaque induced gingivitis: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. Indian J Dent Res. 2009 Jan-Mar;20(1):47-51. PMID: 19336860

[6] Effect of oil pulling on Streptococcus mutans count in plaque and saliva using Dentocult SM Strip mutans test: a randomized, controlled, triple-blind study. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2008 Mar;26(1):12-7. PMID: 18408265

[7] Effects of massage&use of oil on growth, blood flow&sleep pattern in infants. Indian J Med Res. 2000 Dec;112:212-7. PMID: 11247199

[8] The Mechanism of Sesame Oil in Ameliorating Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 Mice. Phytother Res. 2011 Apr 28. Epub 2011 Apr 28. PMID: 21538630

[9]Sesamol attenuate 3-nitropropionic acid-induced Huntington-like behavioral, biochemical, and cellular alterations in rats. J Asian Nat Prod Res. 2009 ;11(5):439-50. PMID: 19504387

[10] Protective effect of daily sesame oil supplement on gentamicin-induced renal injury in rats. Biol Pharm Bull. 2001 Feb;24(2):181-7. PMID: 19487986

[11] Inhibition of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-negative mice by sesame oil. J Med Food. 2006 Winter;9(4) PMID: 17201634

[12] Neuropsychopharmacological effect of sesamol in unpredictable chronic mild stress model of depression: behavioral and biochemical evidences. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2011 Apr ;214(4):819-28. Epub 2010 Nov 20. PMID: 21103863

[13] Antioxidant potential of sesamol and its role on radiation-induced DNA damage in whole-body irradiated Swiss albino mice. Environ Toxicol Pharmacol. 2009 Sep ;28(2):192-7. Epub 2009 Apr 11. PMID: 21784002

[14] Effect of sesamol on radiation-induced cytotoxicity in Swiss albino mice. Mutat Res. 2006 Dec 10 ;611(1-2):9-16. Epub 2006 Oct 11. PMID: 17045515

[15] Sesamol as a Potential Radioprotective Agent: In Vitro Studies. Radiat Res. 2011 Sep 7. Epub 2011 Sep 7. PMID: 21899433

[16] Sesamin manifests chemopreventive effects through the suppression of NF-kappa B-regulated cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and angiogenic gene products. Mol Cancer Res. 2010 May;8(5):751-61. Epub 2010 May 11. PMID: 20460401

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.

Hibiscus Tea: Flower Power

Hibiscus Tea Flower Power

Written By Michael Greger M.D. FACLM

In Friday’s NutritionFacts.org video-of-the-day Better Than Green Tea? I compare the antioxidant content of a number of common beverages. This is part of a series based on the landmark study “The total antioxidant content of more than 3100 foods, beverages, spices, herbs and supplements used worldwide,” available full-text, free online. Previous video installments include Antioxidant Content of 3,139 Foods and Antioxidant Power of Plant Foods Versus Animal Foods.

Most people eat only a few discrete times a day. Sipping a healthful beverage throughout the day allows you to bathe your organs in antioxidants all day long, potentially adding Nutrition Without Calories to our daily diet. Previously my family’s go-to beverage was cold-brewed matcha white tea with lemon, based on the science I covered in The Healthiest Beverage, Cold Steeping Green Tea, Is Matcha Good for You? and Green Tea vs. White. But that was before 283 different beverages were tested in this new study. I had previously covered more than a dozen herbal teas in The Healthiest Herbal Tea, but nothing prepared me for the new king of the hill, hibiscus.

When it comes to antioxidant content, hibiscus beats out green tea, but hibiscus still lacks the weight of clinical evidence. There are only a few hundred studies published on hibiscus, compared to thousands on green tea, but hibiscus does appear to have anti-inflammatory properties, help lower high blood pressure, help lower uric acid levels in gout sufferers, and improve cholesterol and triglyceride levels in pre-diabetics and diabetics. Like chamomile (see Red Tea, Honeybush, & Chamomile), hibiscus tea also appears to inhibit the growth of human cancer cells in a petri dish. You know there’s something to it when the meat industry tries adding hibiscus to their burgers to make them less carcinogenic.

Rats forced to drink the human equivalent of about a 150 cups a day for three months had lowered sperm counts, but no adverse effects on humans have been reported with regular consumption. My only cautions would be that like a number of fruit, vegetable, and herbal beverages, hibiscus may affect drug levels, so you should always let your prescribing physicians know what you’re taking, and the impressive manganese content of hibiscus tea may exceed recommended limits at high intakes, so we probably shouldn’t drink more than a quart a day.

In the video I offer my hibiscus punch recipe, based on “zinger” tea, but here’s an even healthier, cheaper, more environmentally friendly way (thanks Paul!)—just blender in a tablespoon of bulk hibiscus. Then it’s like my Pink Juice—or a hibiscus version of matcha tea—where you don’t miss out on any of the nutrition by throwing away the tea leaves. And instead of erythritol, you can blend in a few dates (thanks “HTWWO”!). Please play around with it and share your own favorite recipe in the comments section below.

About Michael Greger, M.D.

Michael Greger M.D. FACLM

Michael Greger, M.D. FACLM, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized professional speaker on a number of important public health issues. Dr. Greger has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, the National Institutes of Health, and the International Bird Flu Summit, testified before Congress, appeared on The Dr. Oz Show and The Colbert Report, and was invited as an expert witness in defense of Oprah Winfrey at the infamous “meat defamation” trial.

15 Surprising Health Benefits of Hibiscus Tea with Recipes

By Jon Yaneff, CNP

Hibiscus Tea Benefits
Hibiscus Tea: Overview

Hibiscus herbal tea is more than just a delicious beverage. The health benefits of hibiscus tea are what make it so special. Hibiscus tea is made from the deep magenta sepals of the roselle flower, which is thought to be native to Africa. It is also known by its plant name Hibiscus sabdariffa hence the name hibiscus tea. The hibiscus name also comes from the Greek word hibiskos, and it is a flowering plant from the mallow family.

It is important to note that there are 232 species of hibiscus, and not all of them are used for tea or healing. For instance, the Hibiscus sabdariffa plant should not be confused with other hibiscus species such as the non-medicinal Hibiscus acetosella. The traditional hibiscus tea plant has yellow flowers and a red center. The Hibiscus acetosella has red flowers.

Health Benefits of Hibiscus Tea

1. Packed with Nutrients and Antioxidants

Like many other healthy teas, hibiscus tea is loaded with antioxidants. The ones you will find in hibiscus include zinc, vitamin A, vitamin C, and a number of bioflavonoids. Hibiscus antioxidants are mostly found in the anthocyanins of the plant, which are the natural pigments that give the flower its vibrant color.

Antioxidants fight free radical damage to your cells due to frequent exposure to dangerous chemicals and a poor diet.

Research also confirms the beneficial effect of the antioxidant content in hibiscus.

One rat study from 2011 found that hibiscus extract increased the amount of antioxidant enzymes and lowered the harmful effects of free radicals by up to 92%.

Another animal study, from 2009, showed that the leaves of the hibiscus have significant antioxidant properties such as polyphenols and flavonols.

2. Reduces High Blood Pressure

Scientific studies suggest that daily hibiscus tea consumption may benefit people with slightly increased blood pressure. In a six-week study published in the Journal of Nutrition, researchers discovered that hibiscus tea had a greater effect on lowering systolic blood pressure than the placebo, in 65 adults with mildly high blood pressure or pre-hypertension.

Studies have also found that drinking hibiscus tea can lower blood pressure in type 2 diabetics.

3. Helps Lower Cholesterol

The antioxidant properties in hibiscus tea are also thought to benefit people with high cholesterol. Animal studies have found that hibiscus tea may lower total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as the “bad” cholesterol.

Other studies indicate that hibiscus tea may lower cholesterol levels in people with metabolic syndrome or diabetes.

In one study published in the journal Phytomedicine in 2010, the researchers recommended hibiscus extracts to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels in metabolic syndrome patients.

A 2009 study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine found that doses of hibiscus tea twice a day for a month had significantly increased HDL cholesterol, and reduced LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes patients.

A recent study from 2018, published in the Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, found that drinking hibiscus tea had significantly reduced total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol after 12 weeks. The cholesterol-lowering effect was thought to be due, in part, to the antioxidant anthocyanin content.

4. Lowers Diabetes Risk by Reducing Cholesterol and Blood Pressure

In the aforementioned study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine in 2009, researchers found that hibiscus tea could significantly reduce LDL cholesterol and total cholesterol, and raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels in 53 type 2 diabetics.

Another study from 2009 found that daily hibiscus tea consumption could reduce blood pressure in type 2 diabetics.

5. Offers Liver Protection

The antioxidant properties of hibiscus tea may also help treat liver disease. In a study published in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology in 2000, researchers found that the anthocyanins in hibiscus tea could significantly reduce inflammatory liver lesions and oxidative liver damage in rats with toxic livers.

6. Anti-Cancer Properties

Likely due to the antioxidant content in hibiscus tea, there is some research that supports hibiscus tea’s anti-cancer potential. The hibiscus protocatechuic acid found in hibiscus tea has strong antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. It is a metabolite of the polyphenols in hibiscus tea, which may also have potent anti-cancer abilities.

In a study published in the journal Biochemical Pharmacology in 2000, researchers from the Department and Institute of Biochemistry at the Chung Shan Medical and Dental College in Taichung, Taiwan, suggested that the protocatechuic acid in hibiscus tea inhibits cancer cell growth by inducing cell death in human leukemia cells.

Another study published in the journal Molecular Carcinogenesis in 2005 found that hibiscus extracts would also cause cell death when exposed to eight different kinds of gastric carcinoma cells.

More research from 2016 shows that hibiscus extract impairs cell growth and reduces the invasiveness of plasma cell and mouth cancers. Hibiscus also has the potential to prevent the spreading of prostate cancer cells.

7. Helps Relieve Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression

Hibiscus tea health benefits also include calming the nervous system. This helps put people into a positive mind frame to reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety.

In a study published in the Indian Journal of Pharmacology in 2012, researchers found that the flavonoids, anthocyanins, and anthocyanidins in hibiscus have potential antidepressant activity.

Another study from 2012 found that other hibiscus species can help reduce depression in mice.

8. Benefits Weight Loss

Drinking hibiscus tea may also be a useful component of weight loss programs. Hibiscus tea is low in calories, and it is a diuretic herb that helps flush toxins and excess fluids from the body.

In a 12-week study published in the journal Food & Function in 2014, researchers found that hibiscus extract consumption could reduce obesity and abdominal fat, and improve liver damage in obese individuals.

Research published in the journal Medical Hypotheses in 2002 also suggests that hibiscus tea may be a natural weight loss alternative. Furthermore, a 2010 review suggests that herbal teas like hibiscus tea can help support weight loss by increasing the intake of fluids.

9. Improves Digestion

Hibiscus tea is also considered a valuable digestive aid, and it is thought to improve bowel and bladder function. The diuretic properties of hibiscus tea will also help treat constipation and improve the strength of the gastrointestinal system.

The anti-spasmodic effect of hibiscus tea is considered useful for symptoms associated with irritable bowel syndrome.

10. Helps Boost the Immune System

The high amount of vitamin C in hibiscus tea is considered a great immune system booster, and it can help prevent against colds and the flu. It has the ability to lower body temperature; therefore, hibiscus tea benefits may extend to people with a fever as well.

11. Helps Improve Skin Conditions

The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in hibiscus tea, such as vitamins C and A, can effectively treat acne, scars, sunburns, eczema, and skin allergies.

12. Beneficial Effects on Oxidative Stress

As mentioned, hibiscus tea is an incredible source of antioxidants, which prevent free radical damage.

An imbalance between the levels of oxidation and antioxidants in the body is what leads to oxidative stress, and conditions such as cancer, gene mutations, chronic fatigue syndrome, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, atherosclerosis, heart failure, heart attacks, and more.

One study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture in 2012 discovered that hibiscus tea increased antioxidant load in the bloodstream and lowered the functionality of compounds that can contribute to oxidative stress and damage cells.

The researchers suggested that the high number of polyphenols in hibiscus is what made the most impact in the study.

Another study published in the Journal of Dietary Supplements in 2017 found that both hibiscus tea extract and green tea extract had beneficial effects on oxidative stress in male athletes due to a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity.

For the study, 54 male soccer players had randomly received 450 mg daily of hibiscus tea extract, green tea extract, or the food additive maltodextrin.

13. Relieves Menstrual Pain

Hibiscus tea may also provide relief from cramps and menstrual pain. It is thought to be able to restore hormone balance, and therefore potentially lower the severity of menstruation symptoms like depression, mood swings, and overeating.

14. Thirst Quencher

Hibiscus tea is also used to satiate thirst and cool down the body. For this reason, it is popular among athletes and others with high-intensity training regimens. You’ll also find that people often consume iced hibiscus tea.

It is worth noting that since hibiscus tea is a diuretic, it works to flush toxins and excess fluids from the body, and this may promote better performance in athletes.

15. Antibacterial and Antiviral Properties

The antibacterial and antiviral properties of hibiscus tea allow it to fight conditions in which either bacteria or viruses are present.

  • One in vitro study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture in 2013 found that hibiscus tea extract inhibited the activity of E. coli (Escherichia coli), a bacteria strain that causes gas, cramping, and diarrhea.
  • Another lab study from 2016 showed that hibiscus fought eight bacteria strains and was even effective against certain medication used to treat bacterial infections.
  • A 2009 study also showed that hibiscus tea extract may have potential against MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus).

Hibiscus tea extract’s antiviral effects were found to be effective in the prevention and treatment of various forms of influenza, including H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) and low pathogenic AIVs (LPAIVs).

The researchers concluded that the anthocyanin pigment may be responsible for hibiscus tea’s antiviral effect in the study.

Hibiscus Tea Nutrition

As noted, hibiscus tea is loaded with antioxidants such as vitamin A, vitamin C, and zinc. One 100-gram serving of hibiscus contains nearly a third of the vitamin C your body needs in a day. It is also packed with 85% of the vitamin B1 required daily, and almost half of the iron you need each day.

Hibiscus tea is packed full of the essential fatty acids, omega-3 and omega-6. It is also a good source of dietary fiber, protein, vitamin B2, and copper. Hibiscus tea nutrition also features compounds such as malic acid, citric acid, and tartaric acid. The flavonoid glycosides and acidic polysaccharides in hibiscus tea help give it the deep magenta color.

Hibiscus Tea Nutrition Chart

Below is a hibiscus tea nutrition chart. It is a helpful reference tool with all the detailed information on a 100-gram serving size of hibiscus tea:

Hibiscus Tea Recipe

All the health benefits of hibiscus tea likely have you eager to try a cup for yourself. Here is a hibiscus tea recipe that you can make at home right now! You can also put it on ice if you find yourself in need of a cool drink during a hot day.

Ingredients:

4 cups pure filtered water
1/4 cup dried organic hibiscus flowers
1 to 2 tablespoons raw honey
Lime wedges (optional)
Fresh mint leaves (optional)

Directions:

Boil half of the filtered water in a small saucepan.
Add the dried hibiscus flowers and then turn off the heat. Next, steep the liquid until it appears dark red.
Add the remaining two cups of filtered water to the hot tea, and add the raw honey to achieve sweetness when the tea is still warm. You can drink the hibiscus tea hot as it stands. Hot hibiscus tea is also sometimes called Jamaica tea.

As an option, pour the hibiscus tea into a pitcher for serving. Pour the tea into iced-filled glasses. If you like, you can also garnish with mint and lime.

Hibiscus and Ginger Iced Tea Recipe

Want to try something a little different? The following hibiscus tea recipe with ginger is iced, and it will also have you ready for any warm day in the sun on a back porch.

Ingredients:

4 cups pure filtered water
3/4 cups sugar or 1 tablespoon raw honey
1/4 cup dried organic hibiscus flowers
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Lemon wedges

Directions:

Add four cups of water along with ginger and sugar (or honey) to a medium pot; bring to a boil at medium to high heat. Stir until the sugar, or honey, has dissolved.
Next, remove from heat and add the dried organic hibiscus flowers. Then, cover and steep the hibiscus tea for 15 minutes.

Pour the mixture into a fine sieve and into a bowl of ice water. Let it stand until cool and stir in the fresh lemon juice.

Serve the hibiscus ginger tea over crushed ice with a lemon wedge garnish.

Hibiscus Tea Precautions and Side Effects

Although it is loaded with health benefits, there are some minor hibiscus tea side effects to consider before drinking this antioxidant-rich beverage. It is also best to consult with your primary healthcare provider before using this herbal tea.

Be sure not to combine hibiscus with Tylenol, or any other drug containing acetaminophen. The diuretic effect of the beverage may enhance the speed at which acetaminophen releases from the body. Hibiscus tea may also interact with the diuretic called hydrochlorothiazide.

Hibiscus tea is also toxic for the liver in high doses.

Another concern of hibiscus tea is the potential effect it has on pregnant women since it can induce menstruation. This may be helpful for women with irregular periods; however, it also means women drinking hibiscus tea may experience premature labor.

It is also possible to have a hibiscus allergy as some people develop symptoms like hay fever; sinus problems; and itchy, red eyes. Others will feel intoxicated or experience hibiscus tea hallucinations.

Hibiscus tea consumption is also not safe in people who take a medication for malaria called chloroquine. Since it also reduces blood pressure and blood sugar levels, people with diabetes or on antihypertensive drugs should monitor their blood pressure and blood sugar levels.

Final Thoughts on Hibiscus Tea

Hibiscus tea is an excellent antioxidant-rich herbal tea that contains a number of health benefits. In this article, we detailed many of the benefits of hibiscus, including its effect on digestion, immune health, and skin health. At the same time, it may be able to treat high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, liver disease, cancer, depression, anxiety, menstrual pain, weight problems, and bacterial and viral infections.

Like most supplements, it is important to purchase hibiscus extract, leaves, or powder from a trusted source. Some suggest purchasing hibiscus extract in an airless pump that hasn’t been exposed to air so you get the full effect of the hibiscus tea.

Overall, hibiscus tea is delicious, especially when served with lemon juice and raw honey, or flavored with cinnamon, ginger, or nutmeg.

Warning for Pregnant ladies or ladies who wish to become pregnant: studies show a danger of starting your menstrual cycle, or an early delivery. Drink at your own risk. This could be better than birth control pills perhaps. Do some research first.

Article Sources

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Ochani, P.C., et al., “Antioxidant and antihyperlipidemix activity of Hibiscus sabdariffa Linn. Leaves and calyces extracts in rats,” Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, April 2009; 47(4): 276-282, PMID: 1938724, last accessed April 5, 2018.
Gurrola-Diaz, C.M., et al., “Effects of Hibiscus sabdariifa extract powder and preventative treatment (diet) on the lipid profiles of patients with metabolic syndrome (MeSy),” Phytomedicine, June 2010; 17(7): 500-505, doi: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.10.014, last accessed April 5, 2018.
Mazaffari-Khosravi, H., et al., “Effects of sour tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa) on lipid profile and lipoproteins in patients with type II diabetes,” Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, Aug. 2009; 15(8): 899-903, doi: 10.1089/acm.2008.0540, last accessed April 5, 2018.
Hajifaraji, M., et al., “Effects of aqueous extracts of dried calyx of sour tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) on polygenic dyslipidemia: A randomized clinical trial,” Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine, Jan. to Feb. 2018; 8(1): 24-32, PMCID: PMC5787994, last accessed April 5, 2018.
Frank, T., et al., “Consumption of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. aqueous extract and its impact on systemic antioxidant potential in healthy subjects,” Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, Aug. 2012; 92(10): 2207-2218, doi: 10.1002/jsfa.5615, last accessed April 5, 2018.
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Thank You President Trump

Draining The SwampDecember 15th, 2018
Pray for President Trump, the White Hats, our Military and all benevolent beings helping to Free Humanity . Be in JOY and in PEACE. Love others as you Love yourself. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Be an example of Love and Joy. Peace will be ours and so it is.

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