Tossed Out: Food Waste in America

Tossed Out: Food Waste in America

By NETNebraska

Originally Published on Sep 26, 2014

Food waste is the single-largest source of waste in municipal landfills. According to the EPA, 35 billion pounds of food were thrown away in 2011. As it decomposes in landfills, the waste releases methane and other greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Meanwhile, 1 in 7 Americans struggles with hunger and the world wonders how to address the challenge of feeding 9 billion people by 2050.

For more, visit the Harvest Public Media website at http://harvestpublicmedia.org/

NOTE: The original article is available

Here: https://www.harvestpublicmedia.org/topic/tossed-out

This is a great video and food for thought if you forgive the pun.

If I had a large farm, I would be incorporating many of these wonderful ideas.

We are only chicken farmers of free range chicken, we produce eggs. We recycle everything.

Our chickens eat our food scraps or we compost it for our garden.

Living off the land is very rewarding and healthy. We don’t use chemicals at all. Even the wild plants have value. We use so many of these for healing and teas. It is worth studying how to survive off the land. You will benefit greatly by your health and your love for the Earth is always rewarded

Growing your products is the healthy alternative to Fast food, and processed poison that the Cabal have been pushing down our throats for years.

This is one great way to show your support to our Mother Earth and give back to humanity and Nature.

Go Natural and grow your own. Give your excess back in smart ways.

I finally went vegetarian this year and do not regret it.

Studies have shown that people who graze live longer.

Nameste

What Food Manufacturers Don’t Want You To Know: The Pantry

What Food Manufacturers Don’t Want You To Know: The Pantry Principle

Written By:
Helayne Waldman

This article is copyrighted by GreenMedInfo LLC, 2014

I came across a small gem of a book recently. The Pantry Principle, by Mira Dessy contains everything you ever wanted to know about food additives, flavorings, fake sugars, colors, stabilizers, preservatives, emulsifiers and other “non-food” ingredients – but were afraid to ask. In this book she highlights not only the additives you’re familiar with, but others that may not be on your radar. Yet.

So packaged food eaters beware: here’s a hint of just a scant few of the items that lurk beneath the label in your packaged food products. And for those who are trying to get your friends and family off of packaged foods and on to a whole foods lifestyle, here’s some more ammunition!

Diacetyl

Since we’re all familiar with the big offenders such as MSG, I thought I’d pick out a few about which you might know less. Take the case of the chemical used to create the yummy, buttery taste of microwaved popcorn. The chemical of concern is known as diecetyl and it’s been linked to lung disease in the factory workers that process it. Microwave popcorn lung, or more specifically “bronchiolitis obliterans” syndrome is not just limited to factory workers, however.

Diacetyl is so toxic that the U.S. Dept. of Labor issued a warning notice about its use in 2012, the same year a study published in Chemical Research in Toxicology suggested that diacetyl can cause an accumulation of amyloid-B protein, which has been positively linked with Alzheimer’s disease (More, et. al, 2012). Books like Dessy’s are helping to raise awareness of this health menace, and legal judgments are now pending that may finally reduce to the use of this toxin. In the meantime, please read the labels of your microwave popcorn – or better yet, make your own (using non-GMO corn, please).

This leads me to another additive, which still seems to be enjoying immense popularity in both the cosmetics and the food industry.

Propylene Glycol

Propylene glycol is an emulsifier, used to help foods from separating (think oil and water). Many emulsifiers possess anti-caking or anti-foaming properties and are used in whipped goods, while others control the rate of crystallization in foods such as peanut butter. Propylene glycol has a nefarious past as a compound used in antifreeze, and animal studies from decades ago suggest that it can cause depression of the central nervous system (Miller, et al, 1981). It can also be a cause of allergy and asthma in children and create a variety of skin problems. Unfortunately, its name may not always appear on the label since it is covered under an FDA ruling known as “incidental food labeling”, a sleight of hand that allows manufacturer to skip any mention of it on the label. If you buy commercial products like ice cream, national brand yogurts, cakes and other sweets, beer, salad dressing and baking mixes, you can be pretty sure you’ll be ingesting some propylene glycol along with your meal.

The poisons in the package – BHA, BHT, BPA

BHA (Butylated Hydroxyanisole) is a petroleum-based preservative used to retard rancidity in foods with oils or shortening. Despite the fact that a 2011 Report on Carcinogens from the National Toxicology program found BHA to be “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen,” the ever-vigilant FDA continues to regard it as GRAS (generally regarded as safe). Often appearing below the list of ingredients on the nutrition label, it commonly shows up as a disarmingly benign statement such as “BHA added to package for freshness.”

A relative of BHA, BHT (Butylated Hydroxytoluene) is also found in breakfast cereals as well as in chewing gum base and dry potato products. BHT appears to affect the brain, altering neurotransmitter function. Shamefully, this connection was brought to light 40 years ago in a study that looked at developmental changes to the offspring of mice fed BHT. Those changes included negative impacts on sleeping habits, learning, and increased aggression (Stokes and Scudder, 1974).

BPA (Bisphenol A) is an endocrine-disrupting, estrogen-mimicking substance that has also been dubbed obesogenic, meaning it can contribute to obesity.

Women are not the only one who suffer from its endocrine-disrupting action, though. A 2011 study of male factory workers suggests a correlation between exposure to BPA and erectile dysfunction (Zhao et al., 2011) while an experimental study in rats showed a reduction in serum testosterone following BPA exposure. While its use in baby bottles and sippy cups has finally been prohibited by the FDA, its use in can linings, jar lids and thermal papers remains unfettered.

BPA-free plastics may not be the healthy alternative hoped for as other bisphenol-based products appear to have similar endocrine disrupting effects. Tetra paks, on the other hand, are made with paper and low-density polyethylene (LDPE), a non-toxic plastic which appears to have no health impact.

What’s an eater to do?

First, last, and foremost, the best plan of action is to avoid packaged foods altogether. Aside from the additives in the food and the poisons in the packaging, we know that packaged foods are devitalized, depleted versions of the real thing. However, if you are still making the transition, here a few ideas for starters from the fabulous Ms. Dessy:

  • Become an avid label reader. Look for natural additives such as acacia gum, ascorbic acid, agar agar or pectin, rather than those with names you can’t pronounce.
  • Repackage foods found in plastic coatings or coated containers once you bring them home
  • Eat foods rich in folate to help protect against BPA exposure

While this article provides just a peek at the insight Dessy’s book has given us, the book itself is a must have for anyone who is serious about improving their health and well-being or that of their families. Please do yourself a favor – buy this book!

The Pantry Principle is available for purchase on Amazon.com. Dessy’s website: www.grainsandmore.com

Superfoods to combat arthritis


Superfoods to combat arthritis: Ginger, berries, fish and other anti-inflammatory foods

Superfoods to combat arthritis: Ginger, berries, fish and other anti-inflammatory foods

December 11, 2017 

by: Zoey Sky
(Natural News) Individuals diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis can experience mild to severe joint pain, and this often affects their daily lives. Thankfully, there are some superfoods that can help you deal with this kind of pain.
These superfoods help lower oxidative stress, or the body’s ability to “counteract or detoxify harmful chemicals.” Dr. Bhawna Gupta, from KIIT University in India, said, “‘Regular consumption of specific dietary fibers, vegetables, fruits, and spices, as well as the elimination of components that cause inflammation and damage, can help patients to manage the effects of rheumatoid arthritis. 

Incorporating probiotics into the diet can also reduce the progression and symptoms of this disease.” She also advised patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis to switch from “omnivorous diets, drinking alcohol, and smoking” to “Mediterranean, vegan, elemental, or elimination diets,” after consulting their doctor or dietitian.

Based on a recent study, some of the superfoods that you can eat to help fight the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include blueberries, ginger, green tea, and olive oil. Scientists advise sufferers to incorporate more of the foods listed below in their diet because they can help slow down the progressive and debilitating autoimmune disease. (Related: Arthritis – How to relieve the pain and heal naturally.)

Here are some superfoods that you can eat to help ease arthritic pain.

Anti-inflammatory foods to ease arthritis

  • Dairy — Yogurt (curd)
  • Fruits — Dried plums, grapefruits, grapes, blueberries, pomegranates, mangoesbananas, peaches, and apples
  • Herbs — Sallaki (Boswellia serrata), ashwagandha (Withania somnifera)
  • Legumes — Black soybean, black gram
  • Oils — Olive oil, fish oil, borage seed oil capsules
  • Spices — Ginger, turmeric
  • Tea — Green tea and basil (tulsi) tea
  • Whole grains and cereals — Wheat, rice, oats, corn, rye, barley, millets, sorghum, and canary seed

It’s difficult to detect the early stages of rheumatoid arthritis and if left undetected or misdiagnosed, the disease can rapidly progress in the first few years. Dr. Gupta advised, “‘Supporting disease management through food and diet does not pose any harmful side effects and is relatively cheap and easy.” She continued, “Doctors, physicians and dietitians can use our study to summarize current proven knowledge on the links between certain foods and rheumatoid arthritis.” According to Gupta, if doctors determine the nutritional and medicinal requirements of their patients, it can be used to improve their health.

Medical experts often suggest different dietary plans for rheumatoid arthritis, like Mediterranean, vegan, and seven to 10 days of fasting. The research team’s study is only the second overall assessment of diet and food regarding arthritis and was published in the journal Frontiers in Nutrition. The study also focused on reporting dietary interventions and specific foods that have proven long-term effects.

The researchers hope that their study will prove useful as a reference for the development of new medicines. Dr. Gupta shared, “Our review focused on specific dietary components and phytochemicals from foods that have a proven beneficial effect on rheumatoid arthritis… 

Pharmaceutical companies may use this information to formulate nutraceuticals.” The doctor also believes that nutraceuticals have a distinct advantage over chemically-tailored medicines since the former do not have side effects, are made from natural sources, and are cheaper.

Dr. Gupta’s team also reviewed research from several laboratory experiments under different conditions. According to the research, since dietary components can vary based on geography and weather conditions, patients must look into their allergies, nutritional requirements, and other food-related disease history. She concluded that the general public must talk to their health care providers and dietitians first before following any diet program or food compounds covered by the study.

Other recommended foods to fight rheumatoid arthritis

If you want to eat more foods that can help combat the symptoms of this disease, check out the list below:

Blackstrap molasses — While scientific research into the effectiveness of molasses is limited, it can help relieve pain because it is rich in vitamins and nutrients like magnesium. Magnesium helps preserve nerve and muscle function as well as joint cartilage, says the Arthritis Foundation.

Coriander
— Also known as cilantro and Chinese parsley, coriander is one of the many natural remedies that can have a beneficial effect on chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, according to a study published in Toxicology and Industrial Health in September 2014.

Pineapple
— The stem of a pineapple contains bromelain, a digestive enzyme that can help reduce inflammation in people with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. But since pineapple stems are inedible, you can increase your bromelain intake by taking supplements in capsule or pill form.

You can learn more about superfoods and other natural cures at Cures.news.

Sources include:

DailyMail.co.uk
EverydayHealth.com

7 Ways The Pioneers Preserved Food Without Electricity

Wednesday, November 23, 2016

7 Ways The Pioneers Preserved Food Without Electricity

Artist: Joachim Beuckelaer

Written by: Steve Nubie How-To

The pioneers knew more than a few tricks to preserve food for the long-term. Any form of food preservation was designed to kill and inhibit the growth of bacteria, fungus and other micro-organisms. It also was designed to prevent the oxidation of fats which could lead to rancidity.

Our pioneer ancestors needed to master these skills for two reasons:

1. The seasons. Summer and fall were times of plenty, but winter and early spring were not. The ability to preserve food to over-winter in many environments was vital to survival.

2. Long journeys. They were traveling across open prairies in a wagon train, traveling on sailing ships to distant shores, traversing mountains with little or no vegetation or wildlife. Long journeys required stores of food that would keep well and not cause sickness due to food borne illnesses.

Plan Ahead – or Else

You may have heard of the Donner Party. They were pioneers traveling to California who were trapped in the Rocky Mountains during relentless blizzards and cold temperatures. Many slowly starved to death while others resorted to cannibalism. That’s poor planning.

We’re not going to cover the obvious, like canning in mason jars (our pioneer ancestors didn’t have a lot of access to glass or finely crafted metal lids). And they certainly didn’t irradiate foods or use electric dehydrators.

Here are seven ways the pioneers preserved food:

1. Salt. Any civilization living next to a saline or salty body of water had the ability to dehydrate the water and gather salt. In ancient times, it was a valuable commodity and for a while, Roman soldiers were paid their wages with salt.

While we tend to think of salt as a standard seasoning, the value of salt in ancient times was more related to the preservative power of salt. Salt reduces moisture, inhibits bacterial growth and leaves a flavor that’s easy to eat, depending on the salt level. Ships at sea often carried small barrels of pork embedded in a cask of salt or a salt brine. This “salted pork” was standard fare for many people traveling across oceans for long journeys.

Salt is often used in brines to enhance the preservation of fish, fowl and game before drying or smoking, and it’s a standard addition to most pickling recipes and those casks of salted pork.

2. Fat. This may come as a bit of a surprise but fat, especially beef feet or tallow and suet, has exceptional preservative properties. It’s a standard addition to pemmican recipes, which usually involves a 50 percent mix of dried and powdered beef or buffalo and an equal amount of fat plus some raisins or black cherries.

7 Ways The Pioneers Preserved Food Without Electricity

Also, pioneer women would often take cuts of meat and place them into a crock or small barrel and top it with tallow or suet due to its preservative properties. On a fundamental level, the congealed fat is preventing oxygen and airborne microbes from reaching the meat.  It was important to keep any container with these combinations sealed from air.

3. Honey. Good news and bad news about honey. The bad news is that it’s hard to harvest a lot of it, and buying it is expensive. The good news is that it has remarkable preservative properties. In fact, a jar of honey more than 3,000 years old was discovered in an Egyptian tomb, and clinical tests found it to be safe to eat.

Many of our pioneers preserved their most valued cuts of meat in honey and like salt, it added a pleasant taste to the food when eaten.

4. Vinegar. This is perhaps the most potent, natural antiseptic you can safely consume. It’s actually acetic acid and is usually a 4 to 5 percent solution in water. It was also easy to make from various fruits like apples. It was used to preserve everything from vegetables to fruits to meats, fish and fowl.

The typical process involved immersing the food in vinegar in a cask or container, and sometimes salt was added for flavor and additional preservative qualities.

5. Drying or dehydration. This is probably the oldest food preservation technique. It was used to preserve everything from vegetables to fruits and of course meats, fish and fowl.

The critical success factor with drying foods is to remove as much moisture as possible.

  • Beans or legumes were often strung on sticks and hung in the rafter of a cabin or tepee to air dry.
  • Fish were filleted and often salted before being hung in the sun on racks or over smoldering fires.
  • Strips of meat from game were sliced thin, salted if possible and also hung in the sun or over a fire to dry.
  • Fruits were sliced thin and left to dry in the sun and taken indoors at night to continue the drying. They were turned often and sometimes smoked. They, too, were hung on sticks in the rafters at times.

6. Root cellar. This is all about preserving vegetables such as carrots, beets, turnips, radishes, potatoes and parsnips. This approach provides multiple benefits:

  • Fairly consistent temperatures in winter and summer.
  • Consistent humidity, which is beneficial to root vegetables.
  • Protection from insects and animals, to some degree.
  • Protection from sunlight.
  • Easy access to a variety of vegetables
  • Smoking fish, fowl and game over a low and slow draft of smoke in an enclosed space not only dried out the food, but the smoke and moderate heat both killed and inhibited bacterial and fungal growth.

7. Smoking. Smoking over a period of a month or more also allowed larger cuts of meat and whole fish to be successfully dried and preserved, rather than the thin strips usually cut for traditional drying methods.  The meat or fish were sometimes cured with either a dry cure of salt crystals or in a brine.

Even after removal from the smoke house, large pieces of smoked meats would last a long time if kept in a well-ventilated and cool and dark place. Parma hams in Italy hang for months and months in the cool towers of buildings after careful brining and smoking.

Conclusion

Do more research about food preservation and if in doubt, throw it out. Our pioneer ancestors learned the hard way about what worked and didn’t work.

The evidence is in: Raw milk actually boosts immunity, prevents infections

http://www.newstarget.com/2016-08-15-the-evidence-is-in-raw-milk-actually-boosts-immunity-prevents-infections.html

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The evidence is in: Raw milk actually boosts immunity, prevents infections
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By: Vicki Batts
Published August 15, 2016

The evidence is in: Raw milk actually boosts immunity, prevents infections

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) would like us all to believe that raw milk is a flaming health hazard with the potential to cause a national disaster. What could be more toxic than raw food, right? That must be what is making our nation sick – not the over-consumption of genetically-modified, pesticide-laden foodstuffs.

However, a recent study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology has shown that consuming raw milk will not, in fact, be a death sentence. Researchers, doctors and other medical professionals from across Europe joined forces to investigate the effects of consuming raw milk, and revealed that raw milk isn’t just non-toxic, but also yields some impressive health benefits!
NT3

The investigatory project, playfully known as PASTURE, discovered that raw milk can help to prevent viruses, colds and respiratory infections from forming in children when compared to conventional, processed milk. For the study, researchers recruited a group of pregnant women who were in their third trimester. Approximately half of the women lived and worked on livestock farms in rural areas, primarily in central Europe. The researchers asked the women to detail their dietary and lifestyle habits, including their milk consumption. The information was then evaluated and compared.

In total, 983 children were included in the final data set, which is what revealed the truth about raw milk: its immune-boosting health effects are far superior to that of conventional pasteurized milk. The research indicated that raw milk functions a lot like breast milk, in that it imparts immunity to its consumers. Raw milk also helps to reduce C-reactive proteins, which are directly associated with inflammation.

Conversely, conventional milk may actually contribute to inflammation, due to the altered proteins that are created during processing. Essentially, raw milks helps to decrease inflammation, while processed milk creates more inflammation.

The study authors state, “The main finding of this analysis was an inverse association between consumption of unprocessed cow’s milk and rhinitis [cold or runny nose], RTI [respiratory tract infections], and otitis [ear infection].” They also went on to note that raw cow’s milk produced the greatest positive effect, while boiled farm milk produced a more modest benefit.

C-reactive proteins are thought to be one of the leading causes of disease, and raw milk helps to decrease their presence in the human body. Conversely, conventional milk does absolutely nothing to fight their presence. Raw milk consumption was also associated with a 30 percent decreased risk of respiratory infections and fevers, and could even help children to combat these ailments. Minimally processed milk, such as fresh milk boiled right at the farm, was also found to provide a modest benefit to children, though its effects were not nearly as pronounced as those seen in true raw milk.

One of the study’s lead authors, Dr. Ton Baars, a professor and senior scientist for milk quality and animal welfare at the Research Institute of Organic Agriculture in Germany, states that their data provides new evidence of raw milk’s protective qualities, especially against diseases in young children.

Sources:

NaturalNews.com

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And The Beet Goes On…

Source: http://withthegrains.com/2016/04/06/roasted-beet-hummus-vegan/

Roasted Beet Hummus (Vegan)

“Put a beet on it” might be the new “Put a bird on it.” Between the bold color, the natural sweetness and the ability to endure a long winter in storage, the beet has risen in popularity from its humble beginnings as that odd pickled staple at my Czech grandmother’s table.

Roasted Beet Hummus (Vegan) // www.WithTheGrains.com

And “Put a beet on it” I have! From waffles, to cakes, to frostings, and even donuts, I’ve worked that painterly root vegetable’s color and sweetness into every course. When it came time to make a meal to share with a vegan friend, hummus came to mind.

Roasted Beet Hummus (Vegan) // www.WithTheGrains.com

As much as I love hummus, its color palette leaves much to be desired, so I… put a beet on it- roasted beets, tart lemon juice, a kick of garlic and the most important secret, last-minute decision- fresh ginger! The result is a bold, beautiful bowl that makes hummus more dippable and even more addicting than ever!

Quelcy Signature

Roasted Beet Hummus
Recipe type: Vegan, Gluten Free
yield: ~1 quart

About this Recipe: My Palestinian friend taught me his mother’s time-tested secret. Even if you are using canned chickpeas, it pays to soak them in water for at least half an hour and rinse them thoroughly. This makes the chickpea much more digestible! The hummus will keep in the fridge for up to a week (if it lasts that long).

Ingredients

1-2 Tablespoons organic coconut oil
4-5 small beets, peeled

2 15 oz. can (3 1/2 cups) cooked chickpeas, soaked and rinsed thoroughly
zest and juice from 2 large, organic lemons
healthy pinch of smoked salt and black pepper
4 large cloves garlic, minced
1 1-inch chunk of fresh ginger, peeled & minced
4 heaping Tablespoons organic tahini

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

Garnish (Optional)

grilled lemons
slivered almonds
flat leaf parsley or cilantro
drizzle of olive oil

Directions

Preheat oven to 425°F.

Grease a cast iron skillet with melted coconut oil. Roll the beets in the oil to coat. Then roast for 40-60 minutes, until tender. Set aside to cool.

Once your beets have cooled, cut them into large chunks, and place them  in your food processor or blender. Blend until only small bits remain.

Add remaining ingredients except for olive oil, and blend until smooth.

Drizzle in olive oil as the hummus is mixing.

Taste and adjust seasonings as needed, adding more salt, lemon juice or olive oil if needed. If it’s too thick, add a bit of water.

To serve, garnish with grilled lemons, fresh herbs and a drizzle of oil.

Enjoy!

Microwave Dangers

Source:

http://www.jrussellshealth.org/microwaves.html

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June Russell’s Health Facts: Microwaving — Dangers to Your Food and You

Microwave ovens are in 90% of American homes. However, the micro-oven manufacturers, Washington City politics, and plain old human nature are suppressing the facts and evidence. Because of this, people are continuing to microwave their food without knowing the effects or dangers of doing so. One short-term study found significant and disturbing changes in the blood of individuals consuming microwaved milk and vegetables. All foods that were processed through the microwave ovens caused changes in the blood of the volunteers. Hemoglobin levels decreased and over all white cell levels and cholesterol levels increased. Lymphocytes decreased.

In Dr. Lita Lee’s book, “Health Effects of Microwave Radiation – Microwave Ovens,” and in the March and September 1991 issues of Earthletter, she stated that every microwave oven leaks electro-magnetic radiation, harms food and converts substances cooked in it to dangerous organ-toxic and carcinogenic products. Micro ovens are far more harmful than previously imagined. Listed are the many findings of the German and Russian investigators.

Here are just a few:

    Cancer Causing Effects — Creation of a ‘binding effect’ to radioactivity in the atmosphere, creation of cancer-causing agents within protein hydrolysate compounds, malfunctions within the lymphatic systems, higher percentage of cancerous cells within the blood serum, cancer-causing free radicals, stomach and intestinal cancerous growths, with a gradual breakdown of the function of the digestive and excretive systems.

    Decrease In Food Value — Microwave exposure caused significant decreases in the nutritive value of all foods researched. There was a decrease in bioavailability of B-complex vitamins, vitamin C, vitamin E, essential minerals and lipotropics in all foods, a loss of 60 to 90% of the vital energy field of all tested foods, and a marked acceleration of structural disintegration in all foods.

    Biological Effects of Exposure — Breakdown of the human “life-energy field,” degeneration and circuit breakdowns within the front portion of the brain where thought and higher functions reside, loss of balance, long term cumulative loss of vital energy and long-lasting residual effects.

In America, neither universities nor the federal government have conducted any tests concerning the effects on our bodies from eating microwaved foods. Isn’t that odd?

Ten reasons to throw out your Microwave oven (taken from research):

    1. Continually eating food processed from a microwave oven causes long term, permanent, brain damage by ‘shorting out” electrical impulses in the brain (de-polarizing or de-magnetizing the brain tissue).

    2. The human body cannot metabolize (breakdown) the unknown by-products created in microwaved food.

    3. Male and female hormone production is shut down and/or altered by continually eating microwaved foods.

    4. The effects of microwaved food by-products are residual (long term, permanent) within the human body.

    5. Minerals, vitamins, and nutrients of all microwaved food is reduced or altered so that the human body gets little or no benefit, or the human body absorbs altered compounds that cannot be broken down.

    6. The minerals in vegetables are altered into cancerous free radicals when cooked in microwave ovens.

    7. Microwaved foods cause stomach and intestinal cancerous growths (tumors). This may explain the rapid increased rate of colon cancer in America.

    8. The prolonged eating of microwaved foods causes cancerous cells to increase in human blood.

    9. Continual ingestion of microwaved food causes immune system deficiencies through lymph gland and serum alterations.

    10. Eating microwaved food causes loss of memory, concentration, emotional instability, and a decrease of intelligence.

Source: Health Freedom Resources, Public Awareness Announcement #1, June 2000, Radiation Ovens, The Proven Dangers of Microwaves.”

Aquaphonics – The Way to Feed the World

Source: Joy to the World

 

Aquaponics could be a solution to many world problems like world hunger and poverty.

Aquaponics is a great way for people to raise fish and plants together sustainably.

Aquaponics, a system of aquaculture in which the waste produced by farmed fish or other aquatic animals supplies nutrients for plants grown hydroponically, which in turn purify the water.
“thanks to its automatic recirculating system, aquaponics does not require much monitoring or measuring” Aquaponics uses less water & produces more yield than traditional gardening.
Aquaponics as defined by wikipedia is a sustainable food production system that combines a traditional aquaculture (raising aquatic animals such as fish, crayfish or prawns in tanks) with hydroponics (cultivating plants in water) in a symbiotic environment.

http://ibcofaquaponics.com/

http://ibcofaquaponics.com/files/IBCofAquaponics.pdf

Ten Foods That Fight Candida

10 Foods To Fight Candida

 

Written by Dr. Amy Meyers — MindBodyGreen

Do you suffer from mood swings, seasonal allergies, digestive issues, or frequent yeast infections? If so, you may have Candida overgrowth.

Candida is one of the scientific names for yeast, which is a form of fungus. A very small amount naturally resides in your mouth and intestines to aid digestion, but your medications, diet, and environment can all change your normal balance of Candida. When it’s overproduced, it breaks down the wall of the intestines and enters directly into the bloodstream, where it releases toxic byproducts that can cause a leaky gut. Symptoms of Candida overgrowth can range from digestive issues to depression.

Since Candida resides in the gut, diet is an important factor in limiting overgrowth. Here are 10 foods you can eat to help fight Candida overgrowth.

 


Thank You President Trump

Draining The SwampDecember 15, 2018
Pray for President Trump, the White Hats, our Military and all benevolent beings helping to Free Humanity . Be in JOY and in PEACE. Love others as you Love yourself. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Be an example of Love and Joy. Peace will be ours and so it is.

Angel4Light777@gmail.com

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